Investigating the Interaction Between Sleep Symptoms of Arousal and Acquired Capability in Predicting Suicidality

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/617998
Title:
Investigating the Interaction Between Sleep Symptoms of Arousal and Acquired Capability in Predicting Suicidality
Authors:
Hochard, Kevin D.; Heym, Nadja ( 0000-0003-2414-8854 ) ; Townsend, Ellen ( 0000-0002-4677-5958 )
Abstract:
Heightened arousal significantly interacts with acquired capability to predict suicidality. We explore this interaction with insomnia and nightmares independently of waking state arousal symptoms, and test predictions of the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (IPTS) and Escape Theory in relation to these sleep arousal symptoms. Findings from our e-survey (n = 540) supported the IPTS over models of Suicide as Escape. Sleep-specific measurements of arousal (insomnia and nightmares) showed no main effect, yet interacted with acquired capability to predict increased suicidality. The explained variance in suicidality by the interaction (1%?2%) using sleep-specific measures was comparable to variance explained by interactions previously reported in the literature using measurements composed of a mix of waking and sleep state arousal symptoms. Similarly, when entrapment (inability to escape) was included in models, main effects of sleep symptoms arousal were not detected yet interacted with entrapment to predict suicidality. We discuss findings in relation to treatment options suggesting that sleep-specific interventions be considered for the long-term management of at-risk individuals.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Hochard, K. D., Heym, N., & Townsend, E. (2017). Investigating the interaction between sleep symptoms of arousal and acquired capability in predicting suicidality. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 47(3), 370-381. doi:10.1111/sltb.12285
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Publication Date:
2-Aug-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/617998
DOI:
10.1111/sltb.12285
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/sltb.12285/full
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Hochard, K. D., Heym, N. and Townsend, E. (2016), Investigating the Interaction Between Sleep Symptoms of Arousal and Acquired Capability in Predicting Suicidality. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, which has been published in final form atdoi:10.1111/sltb.12285 . This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving
EISSN:
1943-278X
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHochard, Kevin D.en
dc.contributor.authorHeym, Nadjaen
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Ellenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-05T09:52:17Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-05T09:52:17Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-02-
dc.identifier.citationHochard, K. D., Heym, N., & Townsend, E. (2017). Investigating the interaction between sleep symptoms of arousal and acquired capability in predicting suicidality. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 47(3), 370-381. doi:10.1111/sltb.12285en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/sltb.12285-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/617998-
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Hochard, K. D., Heym, N. and Townsend, E. (2016), Investigating the Interaction Between Sleep Symptoms of Arousal and Acquired Capability in Predicting Suicidality. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, which has been published in final form atdoi:10.1111/sltb.12285 . This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archivingen
dc.description.abstractHeightened arousal significantly interacts with acquired capability to predict suicidality. We explore this interaction with insomnia and nightmares independently of waking state arousal symptoms, and test predictions of the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (IPTS) and Escape Theory in relation to these sleep arousal symptoms. Findings from our e-survey (n = 540) supported the IPTS over models of Suicide as Escape. Sleep-specific measurements of arousal (insomnia and nightmares) showed no main effect, yet interacted with acquired capability to predict increased suicidality. The explained variance in suicidality by the interaction (1%?2%) using sleep-specific measures was comparable to variance explained by interactions previously reported in the literature using measurements composed of a mix of waking and sleep state arousal symptoms. Similarly, when entrapment (inability to escape) was included in models, main effects of sleep symptoms arousal were not detected yet interacted with entrapment to predict suicidality. We discuss findings in relation to treatment options suggesting that sleep-specific interventions be considered for the long-term management of at-risk individuals.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/sltb.12285/fullen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.subjectinsomniaen
dc.subjectsuicideen
dc.subjectself-harmen
dc.subjectnightmaresen
dc.titleInvestigating the Interaction Between Sleep Symptoms of Arousal and Acquired Capability in Predicting Suicidalityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1943-278X-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavioren
dc.date.accepted2016-06-09-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08-02-
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