Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/617738
Title:
Addiction, spirituality and 12-step programmes
Authors:
Dossett, Wendy
Abstract:
Drawing on qualitative data, this article attempts to clarify the language of spirituality as used in relation to addiction and recovery. It explores what is meant by ‘spirituality’ in the context of 12-step programmes followed in the numerous anonymous mutual help groups which address the problem of addiction to a variety of substances and behaviours, and raises some of the most frequently cited problems with a ‘spiritual’ approach. It argues that wariness on the part of social workers (and other professionals) of 12-step programmes on grounds of their religious/spiritual dimension may benefit from reconsideration. It also suggests that social workers might be informed and empowered to support those individuals and families who chose to seek recovery through the 12 steps.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Dossett, W. (2013). Addiction, spirituality and 12-step programmes. International Social Work, 56(3), 369–383.
Publisher:
Sage
Journal:
International Social Work
Publication Date:
May-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/617738
DOI:
10.1177/0020872813475689
Additional Links:
http://isw.sagepub.com/content/56/3/369.abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Theology and Religious Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDossett, Wendyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-29T13:08:57Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-29T13:08:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-
dc.identifier.citationDossett, W. (2013). Addiction, spirituality and 12-step programmes. International Social Work, 56(3), 369–383.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0020872813475689-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/617738-
dc.description.abstractDrawing on qualitative data, this article attempts to clarify the language of spirituality as used in relation to addiction and recovery. It explores what is meant by ‘spirituality’ in the context of 12-step programmes followed in the numerous anonymous mutual help groups which address the problem of addiction to a variety of substances and behaviours, and raises some of the most frequently cited problems with a ‘spiritual’ approach. It argues that wariness on the part of social workers (and other professionals) of 12-step programmes on grounds of their religious/spiritual dimension may benefit from reconsideration. It also suggests that social workers might be informed and empowered to support those individuals and families who chose to seek recovery through the 12 steps.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://isw.sagepub.com/content/56/3/369.abstracten
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectaddictionen
dc.subjectspiritualityen
dc.subjecttwelve stepsen
dc.titleAddiction, spirituality and 12-step programmesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInternational Social Worken
dc.date.accepted2013-01-15-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderSir Halley Stewart Trusten
rioxxterms.identifier.projectTRS12-05en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2013-06-01-
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