Difference between low cadence-high resistance and high cadence low resistance in relation to muscle breakdown in cyclists

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/616979
Title:
Difference between low cadence-high resistance and high cadence low resistance in relation to muscle breakdown in cyclists
Authors:
Stanley, Robert
Abstract:
Training at different cadences provides a different training stimulus (Brisswalter et al, 2000) which can be metabolic adaptations or skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Studies have considered the role of cadence in metabolic efficiency and/or participants perceptions of effort (Coyle et al, 1991. Cangley et al, 2009) however there is little literature measuring the efficiency of cadence in relation to muscle breakdown. This may be due to it being difficult to measure muscle breakdown in a noninvasive manner and without conducting a muscle biopsy. Creatine Kinase can be used as a marker of increased muscle breakdown and it is measured using a finger prick blood sample however this indirect method of measuring muscle breakdown is not as reliable and discrepancies in the results can occur as a result of differing response rates between participants or other health issues causing an increase in creatine kinase levels (Brancaccio et al, 2007). Coaches and athletes often use high intensity interval training as a method of improving metabolic efficiency (Laursen et al. 2005) however there is little research into the effects of high intensity interval training for skeletal muscle hypertrophy and strength training in cyclists. This literature review will form the basis for a research project that will consider the effects of differing cadences on muscle breakdown during a high intensity interval training protocol. This research hopes to provide recommendations for coaches and well trained cyclists to improve the training that they conduct to have the desired training stimulus they hope to achieve whether that be increasing muscle breakdown to cause hypertrophy and increase strength or increase adenosine triphosphate production by improving metabolic efficiency. By considering the existing literature surrounding cadence, this review hopes to provide potential reasoning for the results of the proceeding research project. The method’s for how best to conduct the research shall also be reviewed along with a discussion about the use of high intensity interval training protocol’s for well trained cyclists.
Citation:
Stanley, R. (2015). Difference between low cadence-high resistance and high cadence low resistance in relation to muscle breakdown in cyclists (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Sep-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/616979
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStanley, Roberten
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-14T14:43:35Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-14T14:43:35Z-
dc.date.issued2015-09-
dc.identifier.citationStanley, R. (2015). Difference between low cadence-high resistance and high cadence low resistance in relation to muscle breakdown in cyclists (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/616979-
dc.description.abstractTraining at different cadences provides a different training stimulus (Brisswalter et al, 2000) which can be metabolic adaptations or skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Studies have considered the role of cadence in metabolic efficiency and/or participants perceptions of effort (Coyle et al, 1991. Cangley et al, 2009) however there is little literature measuring the efficiency of cadence in relation to muscle breakdown. This may be due to it being difficult to measure muscle breakdown in a noninvasive manner and without conducting a muscle biopsy. Creatine Kinase can be used as a marker of increased muscle breakdown and it is measured using a finger prick blood sample however this indirect method of measuring muscle breakdown is not as reliable and discrepancies in the results can occur as a result of differing response rates between participants or other health issues causing an increase in creatine kinase levels (Brancaccio et al, 2007). Coaches and athletes often use high intensity interval training as a method of improving metabolic efficiency (Laursen et al. 2005) however there is little research into the effects of high intensity interval training for skeletal muscle hypertrophy and strength training in cyclists. This literature review will form the basis for a research project that will consider the effects of differing cadences on muscle breakdown during a high intensity interval training protocol. This research hopes to provide recommendations for coaches and well trained cyclists to improve the training that they conduct to have the desired training stimulus they hope to achieve whether that be increasing muscle breakdown to cause hypertrophy and increase strength or increase adenosine triphosphate production by improving metabolic efficiency. By considering the existing literature surrounding cadence, this review hopes to provide potential reasoning for the results of the proceeding research project. The method’s for how best to conduct the research shall also be reviewed along with a discussion about the use of high intensity interval training protocol’s for well trained cyclists.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectcyclingen
dc.subjectmuscle-damaging exerciseen
dc.titleDifference between low cadence-high resistance and high cadence low resistance in relation to muscle breakdown in cyclistsen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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