Out of Time: The Deaths and Resurrections of Doctor Who

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/616955
Title:
Out of Time: The Deaths and Resurrections of Doctor Who
Authors:
Charles, Alec
Abstract:
Doctor Who is one of television's most enduring and ubiquitously popular series. This study contends that the success of the show lies in its ability, over more than half a century, to develop its core concepts and perspectives: alienation, scientific rationalism and moral idealism. The most extraordinary aspect of this eccentric series rests in its capacity to regenerate its central character and, with him, the generic, dramatic and emotional parameters of the programme. Out of Time explores the ways in which the series' immortal alien addresses the nature of human mortality in his ambiguous relationships with time and death. It asks how the status of this protagonist - that lonely god, uncanny trickster, cyber-sceptic and techno-nerd - might call into question the beguiling fantasies of immortality, apotheosis and utopia which his nemeses tend to pursue. Finally, it investigates how this paragon of transgenerational television reflects the ways in which contemporary culture addresses the traumas of change, loss and death.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Charles, A. (2015). Out of time: The deaths and resurrections of Doctor Who. Oxford: Peter Lang.
Publisher:
Peter Lang
Publication Date:
27-Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/616955
Type:
Book
Language:
en
ISBN:
9783034319416
Appears in Collections:
Media

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCharles, Alecen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-14T09:22:35Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-14T09:22:35Z-
dc.date.issued2015-08-27-
dc.identifier.citationCharles, A. (2015). Out of time: The deaths and resurrections of Doctor Who. Oxford: Peter Lang.en
dc.identifier.isbn9783034319416-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/616955-
dc.description.abstractDoctor Who is one of television's most enduring and ubiquitously popular series. This study contends that the success of the show lies in its ability, over more than half a century, to develop its core concepts and perspectives: alienation, scientific rationalism and moral idealism. The most extraordinary aspect of this eccentric series rests in its capacity to regenerate its central character and, with him, the generic, dramatic and emotional parameters of the programme. Out of Time explores the ways in which the series' immortal alien addresses the nature of human mortality in his ambiguous relationships with time and death. It asks how the status of this protagonist - that lonely god, uncanny trickster, cyber-sceptic and techno-nerd - might call into question the beguiling fantasies of immortality, apotheosis and utopia which his nemeses tend to pursue. Finally, it investigates how this paragon of transgenerational television reflects the ways in which contemporary culture addresses the traumas of change, loss and death.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPeter Langen
dc.subjecttelevisionen
dc.subjectphilosophyen
dc.titleOut of Time: The Deaths and Resurrections of Doctor Whoen
dc.typeBooken
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2000-01-01-
or.grant.openaccessNoen
rioxxterms.funderxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
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