‘Pregnancy, Boobs, Breastfeeding & Babies’ - An explorative insight into the enabling factors supporting successful breastfeeding among young mothers from low socioeconomic groups in Cheshire

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/615900
Title:
‘Pregnancy, Boobs, Breastfeeding & Babies’ - An explorative insight into the enabling factors supporting successful breastfeeding among young mothers from low socioeconomic groups in Cheshire
Authors:
Dunne, Seona
Abstract:
Exclusive breastfeeding to six months of age has been one of the primary aims of nutrition and public health programs across the world (Shahla, Fahy, & Kable, 2010). The benefits of breastfeeding particularly in recent times have been quite established and despite public health initiatives,breastfeeding practice rates in western countries including the UK do not appear to be significantly improving; with most women not continuing breastfeeding until six months postpartum (Shahla, Fahy, & Kable, 2010). Globally, breastfeeding makes an important contribution to meeting the target to reduce infant mortality (Youens, Chisnell, & Marks-Maran, 2014). It has been shown that mothers from lower socio-economic groups, who are less educated, single and younger are less likely to breastfeed (Stewart-Knox, 2013). Low breastfeeding rates in the UK have led to an increased incidence of illness which in turn, has a significant cost implication on the health service (Entwistle, 2013). According to UNICEF, increasing breastfeeding rates in the UK could save the NHS up to £40 million (Thomas, 2014). The Infant Feeding Survey (IFS) 2010, has shown initial breastfeeding rates in the North West of England at 76%. This is below the national average of 83% for England. After 6 months this rate drops to 29%. The Department of Health in England recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life yet by six months, in England, only 34% of babies are breastfed and only 1% of infants are exclusively breastfed (Health and Social Care Information Centre, 2012). Many women do want to breastfeed but without the necessary support, many do not achieve this goal (Thomas, 2012). By understanding what encourages and supports this 29% breastfeeding group to continue breastfeeding, it can help breastfeeding leaders, coordinators and support workers to apply these factors to future campaigns and activities surrounding breastfeeding practices.
Citation:
Dunne, S. (2015). ‘Pregnancy, Boobs, Breastfeeding & Babies’ - An explorative insight into the enabling factors supporting successful breastfeeding among young mothers from low socioeconomic groups in Cheshire. (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Sep-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/615900
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Seonaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-11T10:37:01Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-11T10:37:01Z-
dc.date.issued2015-09-
dc.identifier.citationDunne, S. (2015). ‘Pregnancy, Boobs, Breastfeeding & Babies’ - An explorative insight into the enabling factors supporting successful breastfeeding among young mothers from low socioeconomic groups in Cheshire. (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/615900-
dc.description.abstractExclusive breastfeeding to six months of age has been one of the primary aims of nutrition and public health programs across the world (Shahla, Fahy, & Kable, 2010). The benefits of breastfeeding particularly in recent times have been quite established and despite public health initiatives,breastfeeding practice rates in western countries including the UK do not appear to be significantly improving; with most women not continuing breastfeeding until six months postpartum (Shahla, Fahy, & Kable, 2010). Globally, breastfeeding makes an important contribution to meeting the target to reduce infant mortality (Youens, Chisnell, & Marks-Maran, 2014). It has been shown that mothers from lower socio-economic groups, who are less educated, single and younger are less likely to breastfeed (Stewart-Knox, 2013). Low breastfeeding rates in the UK have led to an increased incidence of illness which in turn, has a significant cost implication on the health service (Entwistle, 2013). According to UNICEF, increasing breastfeeding rates in the UK could save the NHS up to £40 million (Thomas, 2014). The Infant Feeding Survey (IFS) 2010, has shown initial breastfeeding rates in the North West of England at 76%. This is below the national average of 83% for England. After 6 months this rate drops to 29%. The Department of Health in England recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life yet by six months, in England, only 34% of babies are breastfed and only 1% of infants are exclusively breastfed (Health and Social Care Information Centre, 2012). Many women do want to breastfeed but without the necessary support, many do not achieve this goal (Thomas, 2012). By understanding what encourages and supports this 29% breastfeeding group to continue breastfeeding, it can help breastfeeding leaders, coordinators and support workers to apply these factors to future campaigns and activities surrounding breastfeeding practices.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectbreastfeedingen
dc.subjectCheshireen
dc.title‘Pregnancy, Boobs, Breastfeeding & Babies’ - An explorative insight into the enabling factors supporting successful breastfeeding among young mothers from low socioeconomic groups in Cheshireen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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