Impact of type of child growth intervention program on caregivers’ child feeding knowledge and practices: A comparative study in Ga West Municipality, Ghana

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/615375
Title:
Impact of type of child growth intervention program on caregivers’ child feeding knowledge and practices: A comparative study in Ga West Municipality, Ghana
Authors:
Agbozo, Faith; Colecraft, Esi; Ellahi, Basma
Abstract:
Community-Based Growth Promotion (CBGP) delivered by community volunteers aims at enhancing the traditional Growth Monitoring and Promotion (GMP) programme delivered by community health nurses through the promotion of optimum infant and young child feeding (IYCF) leading to improved child growth. This study compared IYCF knowledge and practices among caregiver-child pairs (0-24 months) receiving child welfare services from CBGP (n=124) and GMP (n=108) programmes. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to interview caregivers on IYCF knowledge/practices and validated food frequency questionnaire used to record infants’ food intakes. Group differences were determined using Chi-square and independent samples t-tests (p<0.05; 95% CI). Mean IYCF knowledge scores were similar (CBGP:10.84±1.69 vs. GMP:10.23±1.38, p=0.062). However, more CBGP caregivers (17%) were highly knowledgeable than their GMP counterparts (5%) (p=0.011). Early breastfeeding initiation (CBGP:54% vs. GMP:28%, p<0.0001), exclusive breastfeeding (CBGP:73% vs. GMP:56%, p=0.001) and timely complementary feeding (CBGP:72% vs. GMP:49%, p=0.014) were reportedly higher among CBGP caregivers. Underweight was 11% (CBGP:8% vs. GMP:14%, p=0.154. Mean dietary diversity scores (10 food groups) were similar (CBGP:4.49±1.89 vs. GMP:3.87±1.89, p=0.057) but more CBGP caregivers (77%) achieved minimum dietary diversity than their GMP counterparts (61%) (p=0.035). Few caregivers achieved minimum meal frequency (CBGP:31% vs. GMP:29%, p=0.486) and minimum acceptable diet (CBGP:23% vs. GMP:21%, p=0.464) indicators. Number of children under 5 years owned by caregiver (AOR: 0.405; 95% CI: 1.13-78.53, p=0.038), her educational level (AOR: 0.112; 95% CI: 0.02-0.90, p=0.040) and IYCF knowledge (AOR: 0.140; 95% CI: 0.03-0.79, p=0.026) significantly predicted optimum child feeding. Nutrition education on optimum complementary feeding and birth spacing strategies should intensify.
Affiliation:
University of Ghana; University of Chester
Citation:
Agbozo, F., Colecraft, E., & Ellahi, B. (2015). Impact of type of child growth intervention programme on caregivers’ child feeding knowledge and practices: A comparative study in Ga West Municipality, Ghana Food Science & Nutrition. Food Science and Nutrition, 4(4), 562-572. DOI: 10.1002/fsn3.318
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Food Science and Nutrition
Publication Date:
2-Dec-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/615375
DOI:
10.1002/fsn3.318
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/fsn3.318/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Agbozo, F., Colecraft, E., & Ellahi, B. (2015 - in press). Impact of type of child growth intervention programme on caregivers’ child feeding knowledge and practices: A comparative study in Ga West Municipality, Ghana Food Science & Nutrition. Food Science and Nutrition. DOI: 10.1002/fsn3.318, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/fsn3.318/abstract.
EISSN:
2048-7177
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAgbozo, Faithen
dc.contributor.authorColecraft, Esien
dc.contributor.authorEllahi, Basmaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-01T15:22:26Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-01T15:22:26Z-
dc.date.issued2015-12-02-
dc.identifier.citationAgbozo, F., Colecraft, E., & Ellahi, B. (2015). Impact of type of child growth intervention programme on caregivers’ child feeding knowledge and practices: A comparative study in Ga West Municipality, Ghana Food Science & Nutrition. Food Science and Nutrition, 4(4), 562-572. DOI: 10.1002/fsn3.318en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/fsn3.318-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/615375-
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Agbozo, F., Colecraft, E., & Ellahi, B. (2015 - in press). Impact of type of child growth intervention programme on caregivers’ child feeding knowledge and practices: A comparative study in Ga West Municipality, Ghana Food Science & Nutrition. Food Science and Nutrition. DOI: 10.1002/fsn3.318, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/fsn3.318/abstract.-
dc.description.abstractCommunity-Based Growth Promotion (CBGP) delivered by community volunteers aims at enhancing the traditional Growth Monitoring and Promotion (GMP) programme delivered by community health nurses through the promotion of optimum infant and young child feeding (IYCF) leading to improved child growth. This study compared IYCF knowledge and practices among caregiver-child pairs (0-24 months) receiving child welfare services from CBGP (n=124) and GMP (n=108) programmes. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to interview caregivers on IYCF knowledge/practices and validated food frequency questionnaire used to record infants’ food intakes. Group differences were determined using Chi-square and independent samples t-tests (p<0.05; 95% CI). Mean IYCF knowledge scores were similar (CBGP:10.84±1.69 vs. GMP:10.23±1.38, p=0.062). However, more CBGP caregivers (17%) were highly knowledgeable than their GMP counterparts (5%) (p=0.011). Early breastfeeding initiation (CBGP:54% vs. GMP:28%, p<0.0001), exclusive breastfeeding (CBGP:73% vs. GMP:56%, p=0.001) and timely complementary feeding (CBGP:72% vs. GMP:49%, p=0.014) were reportedly higher among CBGP caregivers. Underweight was 11% (CBGP:8% vs. GMP:14%, p=0.154. Mean dietary diversity scores (10 food groups) were similar (CBGP:4.49±1.89 vs. GMP:3.87±1.89, p=0.057) but more CBGP caregivers (77%) achieved minimum dietary diversity than their GMP counterparts (61%) (p=0.035). Few caregivers achieved minimum meal frequency (CBGP:31% vs. GMP:29%, p=0.486) and minimum acceptable diet (CBGP:23% vs. GMP:21%, p=0.464) indicators. Number of children under 5 years owned by caregiver (AOR: 0.405; 95% CI: 1.13-78.53, p=0.038), her educational level (AOR: 0.112; 95% CI: 0.02-0.90, p=0.040) and IYCF knowledge (AOR: 0.140; 95% CI: 0.03-0.79, p=0.026) significantly predicted optimum child feeding. Nutrition education on optimum complementary feeding and birth spacing strategies should intensify.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/fsn3.318/abstracten
dc.subjectCommunity-based growth promotion; Growth monitoring and promotion; Infant and young child feeding;en
dc.subjectCaregivingen
dc.titleImpact of type of child growth intervention program on caregivers’ child feeding knowledge and practices: A comparative study in Ga West Municipality, Ghanaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2048-7177-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Ghana; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalFood Science and Nutritionen
dc.date.accepted2015-11-01-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-12-02-
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