Preparing British Military nurses to deliver nursing care on deployment. An Afghanistan Study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/613695
Title:
Preparing British Military nurses to deliver nursing care on deployment. An Afghanistan Study.
Authors:
Finnegan, Alan; Finnegan, Sara; Bates, David; Ritsperis, Debra; McCourt, Kath; Thomas, Mike
Abstract:
Background: This paper forms part of the first British Armed forces qualitative nursing research study undertaken on deployment. Aim: To provide an analysis of the impact and effectiveness of the pre-deployment educational preparation and clinical placements provided for military nurses. Theory & methods: A Constructivist Grounded Theory was utilised with data collected through semi-structured interviews with 18 nurses based in Camp Bastion Hospital, Afghanistan during 2013. Results: Initial coding indicated 21 educational preparation and clinical placement categories that influenced the delivery of nursing care. Analysis of these elements led to the identification of four major clusters: Military Nursing Care; Military Nurse Education; Unique Hospital Environment and Clinical Placements. Discussion: Educational preparation consists of completing deployable operational nursing competencies, specialist training and individual tailored courses. This strategywas viewed as proving the appropriate academic requirement. However, training would be enhanced by introducing a formalised military preceptorship programme focussing on fundamental nursing skills. Caring for children was a particular concern, and it was emphasised that educational courses must be combined with a standardised clinical placement policy. Adequate clinical exposure can be challenging as nurses are not routinely exposed to War Zone levels of trauma in the UK. Clinical placements need to be standardised and harmonised, and located in areas where nurses cared for patientswith similar injury patterns to thosewitnessed on deployment. Current NHS Trust placements can reduce the opportunities for employment in suitable clinical environments and diminishing the openings for collective military training. Better use should bemade of clinical rotation programmes, including high dependency units, elective surgery, medical assessment units, paediatrics, and outreach teams such as burns and plastic surgery and pain management. Practice Educators should be utilised to provide education, mentorship, supervision and continuing personal development in the operational arena. The paper considers post-Afghanistan future options.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Finnegan, A., et. al. (2015). Preparing British Military nurses to deliver nursing care on deployment. Nurse Education Today, 35(1), 104-112. DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2014.07.008
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Nurse Education Today
Publication Date:
5-Jan-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/613695
DOI:
10.1016/j.nedt.2014.07.008
Additional Links:
http://www.nurseeducationtoday.com/article/S0260-6917(14)00240-8/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1532-2793
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFinnegan, Alanen
dc.contributor.authorFinnegan, Saraen
dc.contributor.authorBates, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorRitsperis, Debraen
dc.contributor.authorMcCourt, Kathen
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Mikeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-20T11:46:36Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-20T11:46:36Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01-05en
dc.identifier.citationFinnegan, A., et. al. (2015). Preparing British Military nurses to deliver nursing care on deployment. Nurse Education Today, 35(1), 104-112. DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2014.07.008en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nedt.2014.07.008en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/613695en
dc.description.abstractBackground: This paper forms part of the first British Armed forces qualitative nursing research study undertaken on deployment. Aim: To provide an analysis of the impact and effectiveness of the pre-deployment educational preparation and clinical placements provided for military nurses. Theory & methods: A Constructivist Grounded Theory was utilised with data collected through semi-structured interviews with 18 nurses based in Camp Bastion Hospital, Afghanistan during 2013. Results: Initial coding indicated 21 educational preparation and clinical placement categories that influenced the delivery of nursing care. Analysis of these elements led to the identification of four major clusters: Military Nursing Care; Military Nurse Education; Unique Hospital Environment and Clinical Placements. Discussion: Educational preparation consists of completing deployable operational nursing competencies, specialist training and individual tailored courses. This strategywas viewed as proving the appropriate academic requirement. However, training would be enhanced by introducing a formalised military preceptorship programme focussing on fundamental nursing skills. Caring for children was a particular concern, and it was emphasised that educational courses must be combined with a standardised clinical placement policy. Adequate clinical exposure can be challenging as nurses are not routinely exposed to War Zone levels of trauma in the UK. Clinical placements need to be standardised and harmonised, and located in areas where nurses cared for patientswith similar injury patterns to thosewitnessed on deployment. Current NHS Trust placements can reduce the opportunities for employment in suitable clinical environments and diminishing the openings for collective military training. Better use should bemade of clinical rotation programmes, including high dependency units, elective surgery, medical assessment units, paediatrics, and outreach teams such as burns and plastic surgery and pain management. Practice Educators should be utilised to provide education, mentorship, supervision and continuing personal development in the operational arena. The paper considers post-Afghanistan future options.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nurseeducationtoday.com/article/S0260-6917(14)00240-8/abstracten
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.en
dc.subjectMilitaryen
dc.subjectDefence Nursingen
dc.subjectBritish armyen
dc.subjectDeploymenten
dc.subjectAfghanistanen
dc.subjectEducational preparationen
dc.subjectClinical placementen
dc.subjectQualitative researchen
dc.titlePreparing British Military nurses to deliver nursing care on deployment. An Afghanistan Study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1532-2793en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalNurse Education Todayen
dc.date.accepted2014-07-28en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-01-05en
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