Optimising the management of bone disease for coeliac patients in a dietetic-led clinic

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/613200
Title:
Optimising the management of bone disease for coeliac patients in a dietetic-led clinic
Authors:
Martin, Kirsty J.; Woodall, Alison
Abstract:
Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory condition of the small bowel; the only treatment is lifelong adherence to a gluten free diet (GFD). Adherence to a GFD also minimises the risk of associated conditions such as osteoporosis in CD patients. The present study aimed to evaluate and optimise management of bone disease in CD patients in a dietetic-led clinic. This study was conducted in two parts: study 1 utilised retrospective data to evaluate management of bone disease with reference to British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) guidelines in 229 CD patients. Based on the results from study 1, study 2 developed a tool to estimate dietary calcium intake in CD patients, which was then trialled on 50 patients. There were no significant differences between the population demographics for study 1 and study 2. 65% of patients had a diagnosis of osteopenia or osteoporosis, in a female predominant population (74.6%). Reported mean dietary calcium intake was over estimated at 1239.6mg/day (SD ± 377.1mg) in study 1 and corrected to 852mg/day (SD ± 264.57mg) using improved methodology (study 2) (p≤0.05). Understanding and compliance with dietary advice correlated positively with GFD (p≤0.001) but not osteoporosis or fracture risk. Overall patients attending the clinic did not meet the BSG recommended calcium intake. However, 30% of patients could meet the 2014 BSG target from oral diet alone. Utilising individual dietary prescriptions and targeted use of calcium supplementation maximised the opportunity to reduce risk of bone disease and improved compliance with BSG recommendations.
Affiliation:
University Hospital Aintree and The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust; University of Chester
Citation:
Martin, K. J., & Woodall, A. (2016). Optimising the management of bone disease for coeliac patients in a dietetic-led clinic. International Journal of Celiac Disease, 4(2), 48-54.
Publisher:
Science and Education Publishing Co.
Journal:
International Journal of Celiac Disease
Publication Date:
Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/613200
DOI:
10.12691/ijcd-4-2-6
Additional Links:
http://www.sciepub.com/journal/IJCD
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2334-3427
EISSN:
2334-3486
Appears in Collections:
Clinical Sciences and Nutrition

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Kirsty J.en
dc.contributor.authorWoodall, Alisonen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-15T11:52:33Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-15T11:52:33Zen
dc.date.issued2016-06en
dc.identifier.citationMartin, K. J., & Woodall, A. (2016). Optimising the management of bone disease for coeliac patients in a dietetic-led clinic. International Journal of Celiac Disease, 4(2), 48-54.en
dc.identifier.issn2334-3427en
dc.identifier.doi10.12691/ijcd-4-2-6en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/613200en
dc.description.abstractCoeliac disease (CD) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory condition of the small bowel; the only treatment is lifelong adherence to a gluten free diet (GFD). Adherence to a GFD also minimises the risk of associated conditions such as osteoporosis in CD patients. The present study aimed to evaluate and optimise management of bone disease in CD patients in a dietetic-led clinic. This study was conducted in two parts: study 1 utilised retrospective data to evaluate management of bone disease with reference to British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) guidelines in 229 CD patients. Based on the results from study 1, study 2 developed a tool to estimate dietary calcium intake in CD patients, which was then trialled on 50 patients. There were no significant differences between the population demographics for study 1 and study 2. 65% of patients had a diagnosis of osteopenia or osteoporosis, in a female predominant population (74.6%). Reported mean dietary calcium intake was over estimated at 1239.6mg/day (SD ± 377.1mg) in study 1 and corrected to 852mg/day (SD ± 264.57mg) using improved methodology (study 2) (p≤0.05). Understanding and compliance with dietary advice correlated positively with GFD (p≤0.001) but not osteoporosis or fracture risk. Overall patients attending the clinic did not meet the BSG recommended calcium intake. However, 30% of patients could meet the 2014 BSG target from oral diet alone. Utilising individual dietary prescriptions and targeted use of calcium supplementation maximised the opportunity to reduce risk of bone disease and improved compliance with BSG recommendations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherScience and Education Publishing Co.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciepub.com/journal/IJCDen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectcalciumen
dc.subjectcoeliac diseaseen
dc.subjectdietitianen
dc.subjectgluten-free dieten
dc.subjectoesteoporosisen
dc.titleOptimising the management of bone disease for coeliac patients in a dietetic-led clinicen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2334-3486en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity Hospital Aintree and The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Celiac Diseaseen
dc.description.linkhttp://pubs.sciepub.com/ijcd/4/2/6/en
dc.date.accepted2016-05-09en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAOen
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