Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/612743
Title:
Unsettled Natives in the Newfoundland Imaginary
Authors:
Owen, Suzanne
Abstract:
In Newfoundland, the last Beothuk died nearly two hundred years ago and both European settlers and Mi'kmaq have been blamed for their demise. This history is contentious, as is the way the demise of the Beothuk is represented in museums, literature and the arts, which may be regarded as public acts of remembering. Indigeneity debates here relate to other identity issues linked to resisting the subsumation of Newfoundland into Canada since confederation in 1949. Drawing on postcolonial literature studies, this chapter investigates how the theme of ‘unsettled natives’ – referring to both the subject (contemporary Newfoundlanders) and the object (Beothuk) – is portrayed in literature and art where the presence of the extinct Beothuk haunts the Newfoundland imaginary.
Affiliation:
University of Chester; Leeds Trinity University
Citation:
Owen, S. (2017). Unsettled Natives in the Newfoundland Imaginary. In S. E. Kraft & G. Johnson (Eds.), Handbook of Indigenous Religion(s): Local Grounds, Global Networks (pp. 221-233). Leiden: Brill.
Publisher:
Brill
Publication Date:
Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/612743
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781857436419
Appears in Collections:
Theology and Religious Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Suzanneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-13T14:01:19Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-13T14:01:19Zen
dc.date.issued2017-06en
dc.identifier.citationOwen, S. (2017). Unsettled Natives in the Newfoundland Imaginary. In S. E. Kraft & G. Johnson (Eds.), Handbook of Indigenous Religion(s): Local Grounds, Global Networks (pp. 221-233). Leiden: Brill.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781857436419-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/612743en
dc.description.abstractIn Newfoundland, the last Beothuk died nearly two hundred years ago and both European settlers and Mi'kmaq have been blamed for their demise. This history is contentious, as is the way the demise of the Beothuk is represented in museums, literature and the arts, which may be regarded as public acts of remembering. Indigeneity debates here relate to other identity issues linked to resisting the subsumation of Newfoundland into Canada since confederation in 1949. Drawing on postcolonial literature studies, this chapter investigates how the theme of ‘unsettled natives’ – referring to both the subject (contemporary Newfoundlanders) and the object (Beothuk) – is portrayed in literature and art where the presence of the extinct Beothuk haunts the Newfoundland imaginary.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBrillen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectNewfoundlanden
dc.subjectBeothuken
dc.subjectMi'kmaqen
dc.subjectIndigeneityen
dc.titleUnsettled Natives in the Newfoundland Imaginaryen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; Leeds Trinity Universityen
dc.date.accepted2016-05-02en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderBritish Academy Small Grant awarden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectRO1en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2216-06-13en
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