Social Theory, Performativity and Professional Power—A Critical Analysis of Helping Professions in England

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/612190
Title:
Social Theory, Performativity and Professional Power—A Critical Analysis of Helping Professions in England
Authors:
Powell, Jason; Carey, Malcolm
Abstract:
Drawing from interviews and ethnographic research, evidence is provided to suggest a sense of "anxiety" and "regret" amongst state social workers and case managers working on the "front-line" within local authority social service departments. There have been a number of theoretical approaches that have attempted to ground the concept of "power" to understand organizational practice though Foucauldian insights have been most captivating in illuminating power relations and subject positioning. In order to theoretically interrogate the relationship between social theory and professional power, we draw from the neo-Foucauldian work of American Social Philosopher Judith Butler—especially regarding Butler's (1990, 1993 and 1998) powerful work on "performativity" and its relationship to social work. We also attempt to examine the "distances" between the social work role and social workers narratives through an examination of notions of "anxiety" and "regret" in the face of the professionalisation of state social work.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Powell, J. L., & Carey, M. (2007). Social theory, performativity and professional power: A critical analysis of helping professions in England. Human Affairs, 17(1), 78-94
Publisher:
De Gruyter
Journal:
Human Affairs
Publication Date:
1-Jun-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/612190
DOI:
10.2478/v10023-007-0008-7
Additional Links:
http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/humaff.2007.17.issue-1/v10023-007-0008-7/v10023-007-0008-7.xml
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1210-3055
EISSN:
1337-401X
Appears in Collections:
Social and Political Science

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Jasonen
dc.contributor.authorCarey, Malcolmen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-08T08:12:44Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-08T08:12:44Zen
dc.date.issued2007-06-01en
dc.identifier.citationPowell, J. L., & Carey, M. (2007). Social theory, performativity and professional power: A critical analysis of helping professions in England. Human Affairs, 17(1), 78-94en
dc.identifier.issn1210-3055en
dc.identifier.doi10.2478/v10023-007-0008-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/612190en
dc.description.abstractDrawing from interviews and ethnographic research, evidence is provided to suggest a sense of "anxiety" and "regret" amongst state social workers and case managers working on the "front-line" within local authority social service departments. There have been a number of theoretical approaches that have attempted to ground the concept of "power" to understand organizational practice though Foucauldian insights have been most captivating in illuminating power relations and subject positioning. In order to theoretically interrogate the relationship between social theory and professional power, we draw from the neo-Foucauldian work of American Social Philosopher Judith Butler—especially regarding Butler's (1990, 1993 and 1998) powerful work on "performativity" and its relationship to social work. We also attempt to examine the "distances" between the social work role and social workers narratives through an examination of notions of "anxiety" and "regret" in the face of the professionalisation of state social work.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDe Gruyteren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.degruyter.com/view/j/humaff.2007.17.issue-1/v10023-007-0008-7/v10023-007-0008-7.xmlen
dc.subjectBritish State Social Worken
dc.subjectRegreten
dc.titleSocial Theory, Performativity and Professional Power—A Critical Analysis of Helping Professions in Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1337-401Xen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalHuman Affairsen
dc.date.accepted2007-03-03en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionNAen
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