Culture, Politics and Drama Education: The Creative Agenda 1997-2015

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/611685
Title:
Culture, Politics and Drama Education: The Creative Agenda 1997-2015
Authors:
Piasecka, Shelley ( 0000-0002-5224-0490 )
Abstract:
In the years following New Labour’s election victory (1997) the creative agenda was a visible concern for schools and teachers. A number of influential documents and policy documents were launched to promote creativity in schools. New funding opportunities had been made available to support teachers and classroom learning, most notably the Arts Council initiative Creative Partnerships (2002). Buckingham and Jones (2001) describe the period as the “Cultural Turn” towards the creative and cultural industries. Paradoxically, the creative agenda emerged at a time when teachers experienced unprecedented levels of control over, and public scrutiny of, their everyday working lives; it was a period of time dominated by a ‘bureaucratisation” of education. For Stronach et al. (2002) it was a rise of a performativity discourse in response to the audit culture. Post 2010, the introduction of school performance measures, such as the compulsory English Baccalaureate (2015), offers another kind of performativity discourse, but from a perspective other than creativity. The long-term outlook for creative subjects appears bleak, particularly for dance and drama. This article examines the period 1997-2015 with reference to Neelands and Choe’s (2010) assertion that creativity is a cultural and political idea.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Piasecka, S. (2016). Culture, Politics and Drama Education: The Creative Agenda 1997-2015, 7(1).
Publisher:
National Drama Publications
Journal:
Drama Research: International Journal of Drama in Education
Publication Date:
7-May-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/611685
Additional Links:
http://www.nationaldrama.org.uk/journal/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a published work that appeared in final form in Drama Research: International Journal of Drama in Education. To access the final edited and published work see http://www.nationaldrama.org.uk/journal/.
ISSN:
2040-2228
Appears in Collections:
Performing Arts

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPiasecka, Shelleyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-03T10:08:49Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-03T10:08:49Zen
dc.date.issued2016-05-07en
dc.identifier.citationPiasecka, S. (2016). Culture, Politics and Drama Education: The Creative Agenda 1997-2015, 7(1).en
dc.identifier.issn2040-2228en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/611685en
dc.descriptionThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a published work that appeared in final form in Drama Research: International Journal of Drama in Education. To access the final edited and published work see http://www.nationaldrama.org.uk/journal/.-
dc.description.abstractIn the years following New Labour’s election victory (1997) the creative agenda was a visible concern for schools and teachers. A number of influential documents and policy documents were launched to promote creativity in schools. New funding opportunities had been made available to support teachers and classroom learning, most notably the Arts Council initiative Creative Partnerships (2002). Buckingham and Jones (2001) describe the period as the “Cultural Turn” towards the creative and cultural industries. Paradoxically, the creative agenda emerged at a time when teachers experienced unprecedented levels of control over, and public scrutiny of, their everyday working lives; it was a period of time dominated by a ‘bureaucratisation” of education. For Stronach et al. (2002) it was a rise of a performativity discourse in response to the audit culture. Post 2010, the introduction of school performance measures, such as the compulsory English Baccalaureate (2015), offers another kind of performativity discourse, but from a perspective other than creativity. The long-term outlook for creative subjects appears bleak, particularly for dance and drama. This article examines the period 1997-2015 with reference to Neelands and Choe’s (2010) assertion that creativity is a cultural and political idea.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Drama Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nationaldrama.org.uk/journal/en
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.en
dc.subjectDramaen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectCreativityen
dc.subjectPoliticsen
dc.titleCulture, Politics and Drama Education: The Creative Agenda 1997-2015en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalDrama Research: International Journal of Drama in Educationen
dc.date.accepted2016-03-09en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2216-05-07en
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