Influencing the attachment of bacteria through laser surface engineering

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/610775
Title:
Influencing the attachment of bacteria through laser surface engineering
Authors:
Gillett, Alice R.; Waugh, David G.; Lawrence, Jonathan
Abstract:
Bacteria have evolved to become proficient at adapting to both extracellular and environmental conditions, which has made it possible for them to attach and subsequently form biofilms on varying surfaces. This has resulted in major health concerns and economic burden in both hospital and industrial environments. Surfaces which prevent this bacterial fouling through their physical structure represent a key area of research for the development of antibacterial surfaces for many different environments. Laser surface treatment provides a potential candidate for the production of anti-biofouling surfaces for wide ranging surface applications within healthcare and industrial disciplines. In the present study, a KrF 248 nm Excimer laser was utilized to surface pattern Polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The surface topography and roughness were determined with the use of a Micromeasure 2, 3D profiler. Escherichia coli (E. coli) growth was analysed at high shear flow using a CDC Biofilm reactor for 48 hours, scanning electron microscopy was used to determine morphology and total viable counts were made. Through this work it has been shown that the surface modification significantly influenced the distribution and morphology of the attached E. coli cells. What is more, it has been evidenced that the laser-modified PET has been shown to prevent E. coli cells from attaching themselves within the laser-induced micro-surface-features.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Gillett, A.R., Waugh D. G., Lawrence J. (2015). Influencing the attachment of bacteria through laser surface engineering. The 34th International Congress on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics (ICALEO 2015), 18-22 October 2015, Atlanta, GA., USA
Publisher:
Laser Institute of America
Publication Date:
Oct-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/610775
Additional Links:
http://icaleo2015.conferencespot.org/
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
Description:
Also published in Journal of Laser Applications (2017). eISSN - 1938-1387.
ISBN:
978-1-940168-05-0
Appears in Collections:
Mechanical Engineering

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGillett, Alice R.en
dc.contributor.authorWaugh, David G.en
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Jonathanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-25T18:00:55Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-25T18:00:55Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10en
dc.identifier.citationGillett, A.R., Waugh D. G., Lawrence J. (2015). Influencing the attachment of bacteria through laser surface engineering. The 34th International Congress on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics (ICALEO 2015), 18-22 October 2015, Atlanta, GA., USAen
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-940168-05-0en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/610775en
dc.descriptionAlso published in Journal of Laser Applications (2017). eISSN - 1938-1387.-
dc.description.abstractBacteria have evolved to become proficient at adapting to both extracellular and environmental conditions, which has made it possible for them to attach and subsequently form biofilms on varying surfaces. This has resulted in major health concerns and economic burden in both hospital and industrial environments. Surfaces which prevent this bacterial fouling through their physical structure represent a key area of research for the development of antibacterial surfaces for many different environments. Laser surface treatment provides a potential candidate for the production of anti-biofouling surfaces for wide ranging surface applications within healthcare and industrial disciplines. In the present study, a KrF 248 nm Excimer laser was utilized to surface pattern Polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The surface topography and roughness were determined with the use of a Micromeasure 2, 3D profiler. Escherichia coli (E. coli) growth was analysed at high shear flow using a CDC Biofilm reactor for 48 hours, scanning electron microscopy was used to determine morphology and total viable counts were made. Through this work it has been shown that the surface modification significantly influenced the distribution and morphology of the attached E. coli cells. What is more, it has been evidenced that the laser-modified PET has been shown to prevent E. coli cells from attaching themselves within the laser-induced micro-surface-features.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLaser Institute of Americaen
dc.relation.urlhttp://icaleo2015.conferencespot.org/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectKrF Laseren
dc.subjectmicrobiologyen
dc.subjectE. Colien
dc.subjectsurface treatmenten
dc.subjectsurface roughnessen
dc.titleInfluencing the attachment of bacteria through laser surface engineeringen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2015-05en
or.grant.openaccessyesen
rioxxterms.funderxxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
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