Energy expenditure derived from micro-technology is not suitable for assessing internal load in collision-based activities

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/610715
Title:
Energy expenditure derived from micro-technology is not suitable for assessing internal load in collision-based activities
Authors:
Highton, Jamie M.; Mullen, Thomas; Norris, Jonathan; Oxendale, Chelsea; Twist, Craig
Abstract:
This aim of this study was to examine the validity of energy expenditure derived from micro-technology when measured during a repeated effort rugby protocol. Sixteen male rugby players completed a repeated effort protocol comprising 3 sets of 6 collisions during which movement activity and energy expenditure (EEGPS) were measured using micro-technology. In addition, energy expenditure was also estimated from open circuit spirometry (EEVO2). Whilst related (r = 0.63, 90%CI 0.08-0.89), there was a systematic underestimation of energy expenditure during the protocol (-5.94 ± 0.67 kcalmin-1) for EEGPS (7.2 ± 1.0 kcalmin-1) compared to EEVO2 (13.2 ± 2.3 kcalmin-1). High-speed running distance (r = 0.50, 95%CI -0.66-0.84) was related to EEVO2, while Player Load was not (r = 0.37, 95%CI -0.81-0.68). Whilst metabolic power might provide a different measure of external load than other typically used micro-technology metrics (e.g. high-speed running, Player Load), it underestimates energy expenditure during intermittent team sports that involve collisions.
Citation:
Highton, J., Mullen, T., Norris, J., Oxendale, C., & Twist, C. (2016). Energy expenditure derived from micro-technology is not suitable for assessing internal load in collision-based cctivities. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 1-15. doi: doi:10.1123/ijspp.2016-0069
Publisher:
Human Kinetics
Journal:
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Publication Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/610715
DOI:
10.1123/ijspp.2016-0069
Additional Links:
http://journals.humankinetics.com/ijspp-in-press/ijspp-in-press/energy-expenditure-derived-from-micro-technology-is-not-suitable-for-assessing-internal-load-in-collision-based-activities; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27193085
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
As accepted for publication
EISSN:
1555-0273
Appears in Collections:
Sport and Exercise Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHighton, Jamie M.en
dc.contributor.authorMullen, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorNorris, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorOxendale, Chelseaen
dc.contributor.authorTwist, Craigen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-25T14:37:53Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-25T14:37:53Zen
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.citationHighton, J., Mullen, T., Norris, J., Oxendale, C., & Twist, C. (2016). Energy expenditure derived from micro-technology is not suitable for assessing internal load in collision-based cctivities. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 1-15. doi: doi:10.1123/ijspp.2016-0069en
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/ijspp.2016-0069en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/610715en
dc.descriptionAs accepted for publicationen
dc.description.abstractThis aim of this study was to examine the validity of energy expenditure derived from micro-technology when measured during a repeated effort rugby protocol. Sixteen male rugby players completed a repeated effort protocol comprising 3 sets of 6 collisions during which movement activity and energy expenditure (EEGPS) were measured using micro-technology. In addition, energy expenditure was also estimated from open circuit spirometry (EEVO2). Whilst related (r = 0.63, 90%CI 0.08-0.89), there was a systematic underestimation of energy expenditure during the protocol (-5.94 ± 0.67 kcalmin-1) for EEGPS (7.2 ± 1.0 kcalmin-1) compared to EEVO2 (13.2 ± 2.3 kcalmin-1). High-speed running distance (r = 0.50, 95%CI -0.66-0.84) was related to EEVO2, while Player Load was not (r = 0.37, 95%CI -0.81-0.68). Whilst metabolic power might provide a different measure of external load than other typically used micro-technology metrics (e.g. high-speed running, Player Load), it underestimates energy expenditure during intermittent team sports that involve collisions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHuman Kineticsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.humankinetics.com/ijspp-in-press/ijspp-in-press/energy-expenditure-derived-from-micro-technology-is-not-suitable-for-assessing-internal-load-in-collision-based-activitiesen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27193085en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectRugbyen
dc.subjectTackleen
dc.titleEnergy expenditure derived from micro-technology is not suitable for assessing internal load in collision-based activitiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1555-0273en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performanceen
dc.date.accepted2016-04-27en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2216-05-25en
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