Questioning authority: New perspectives on Milgram’s ‘obedience’ research and its implications for intergroup relations

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/607101
Title:
Questioning authority: New perspectives on Milgram’s ‘obedience’ research and its implications for intergroup relations
Authors:
Haslam, S. Alexander; Reicher, Stephen D.; Birney, Megan E.
Abstract:
Traditionally, Milgram's 'obedience' studies have been used to propose that 'ordinary people' are capable of inflicting great harm on outgroup members because they are predisposed to follow orders. According to this account, people focus so much on being good followers that they become unaware of the consequences of their actions. Atrocity is thus seen to derive from inattention. However recent work in psychology, together with historical reassessments of Nazi perpetrators, questions this analysis. In particular, forensic re-examination of Milgram's own findings, allied to new psychological and historical research, supports an “engaged follower” analysis in which the behaviour of perpetrators is understood to derive from identification with, and commitment to, an ingroup cause that is believed to be noble and worthwhile.
Affiliation:
University of Queensland; University of St. Andrews; University of Chester
Citation:
Haslam, S. A., Reicher, S. D., & Birney, M. E. (2016). Questioning authority: New perspectives on Milgram's 'obedience' research and its implications for intergroup relations. Current Opinion in Psychology, 11, 6-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.copsyc.2016.03.007
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Current Opinion in Psychology
Publication Date:
23-Apr-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/607101
DOI:
10.1016/j.copsyc.2016.03.007
Additional Links:
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/current-opinion-in-psychology/
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
2352-250X
EISSN:
2352-250X
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHaslam, S. Alexanderen
dc.contributor.authorReicher, Stephen D.en
dc.contributor.authorBirney, Megan E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-26T09:44:37Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-26T09:44:37Zen
dc.date.issued2016-04-23en
dc.identifier.citationHaslam, S. A., Reicher, S. D., & Birney, M. E. (2016). Questioning authority: New perspectives on Milgram's 'obedience' research and its implications for intergroup relations. Current Opinion in Psychology, 11, 6-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.copsyc.2016.03.007en
dc.identifier.issn2352-250Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.copsyc.2016.03.007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/607101en
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, Milgram's 'obedience' studies have been used to propose that 'ordinary people' are capable of inflicting great harm on outgroup members because they are predisposed to follow orders. According to this account, people focus so much on being good followers that they become unaware of the consequences of their actions. Atrocity is thus seen to derive from inattention. However recent work in psychology, together with historical reassessments of Nazi perpetrators, questions this analysis. In particular, forensic re-examination of Milgram's own findings, allied to new psychological and historical research, supports an “engaged follower” analysis in which the behaviour of perpetrators is understood to derive from identification with, and commitment to, an ingroup cause that is believed to be noble and worthwhile.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.elsevier.com/current-opinion-in-psychology/en
dc.subjectMilgramen
dc.subjectObedienceen
dc.subjectConformityen
dc.subjectSocial Identificationen
dc.subjectFollowershipen
dc.titleQuestioning authority: New perspectives on Milgram’s ‘obedience’ research and its implications for intergroup relationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2352-250Xen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Queensland; University of St. Andrews; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Opinion in Psychologyen
dc.date.accepted2016-03-23en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderEconomic and Social Research Councilen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectAustralian Research Council (to first author)en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCanadian Institute for Advanced Research (to first author)en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectEconomic and Social Research Council (to second author)en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-04-23en
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.