Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’: A GIS Study of Literary Tourism in Victorian Lakeland

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/606088
Title:
Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’: A GIS Study of Literary Tourism in Victorian Lakeland
Authors:
Donaldson, Christopher; Gregory, Ian; Murrieta-Flores, Patricia ( 0000-0001-9904-0288 )
Abstract:
This article answers the call for scholarship that models the implementation of geographic information systems (GIS) technologies in literary-historical research. In doing so, it creates a step change to the integration of digital methodologies in the humanities. Combining methods and perspectives from cultural history, literary studies, and geographic information sciences, the article confirms, challenges, and extends understanding of Victorian literary tourism in the English Lake District. It engages with the accounts of several nineteenth-century tourists, paying specific attention to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s English Notebooks and Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley’s A Coach Drive at the Lakes, which are examined alongside contemporaneous guidebooks and other commercial tourist publications. In the process, the article draws attention to a spatial correlation between the route of the Ambleside turnpike (the Lake District’s principal coach road) and the major literary sites to which Victorian Lakeland visitors were guided. Recognizing this correlation, we contend, helps to deepen our appreciation of how the physical and imaginative geographies of the Lake District region interrelate. Specifically, it helps us appreciate how the Victorian fascination with the Lakeland’s literary associations was modulated not only by interest in the region’s other attractions, but also by material conditions on the ground.
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham; Lancaster University; University of Chester
Citation:
Donaldson, C., Gregory, I., & Murrieta-Flores, P. (2015). Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’: A GIS Study of Literary Tourism in Victorian Lakeland. Journal of Victorian Culture, 20(3), 287-307. DOI:10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Journal of Victorian Culture
Publication Date:
14-Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/606088
DOI:
10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Victorian Culture on 14/08/2015, available online: doi: 10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089
EISSN:
1750-0133
Appears in Collections:
History and Archaeology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDonaldson, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Ianen
dc.contributor.authorMurrieta-Flores, Patriciaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-20T16:52:44Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-20T16:52:44Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-14en
dc.identifier.citationDonaldson, C., Gregory, I., & Murrieta-Flores, P. (2015). Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’: A GIS Study of Literary Tourism in Victorian Lakeland. Journal of Victorian Culture, 20(3), 287-307. DOI:10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/606088en
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Victorian Culture on 14/08/2015, available online: doi: 10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089en
dc.description.abstractThis article answers the call for scholarship that models the implementation of geographic information systems (GIS) technologies in literary-historical research. In doing so, it creates a step change to the integration of digital methodologies in the humanities. Combining methods and perspectives from cultural history, literary studies, and geographic information sciences, the article confirms, challenges, and extends understanding of Victorian literary tourism in the English Lake District. It engages with the accounts of several nineteenth-century tourists, paying specific attention to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s English Notebooks and Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley’s A Coach Drive at the Lakes, which are examined alongside contemporaneous guidebooks and other commercial tourist publications. In the process, the article draws attention to a spatial correlation between the route of the Ambleside turnpike (the Lake District’s principal coach road) and the major literary sites to which Victorian Lakeland visitors were guided. Recognizing this correlation, we contend, helps to deepen our appreciation of how the physical and imaginative geographies of the Lake District region interrelate. Specifically, it helps us appreciate how the Victorian fascination with the Lakeland’s literary associations was modulated not only by interest in the region’s other attractions, but also by material conditions on the ground.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089en
dc.subjectLiterary tourismen
dc.subjectWilliam Wordsworthen
dc.subjectNathaniel Hawthorneen
dc.subjectLake Districten
dc.subjectGeographic Information Systems (GIS)en
dc.subjectDigital Humanitiesen
dc.subjectMobility Stufiesen
dc.titleMapping ‘Wordsworthshire’: A GIS Study of Literary Tourism in Victorian Lakelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1750-0133en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Birmingham; Lancaster University; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Victorian Cultureen
dc.date.accepted2015-01-01en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderEuropean Research Councilen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectnon-RCUK-non UoCen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-02-14en
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