On Thinking Theologically about Animals: A Response

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/605410
Title:
On Thinking Theologically about Animals: A Response
Authors:
Clough, David
Abstract:
In response to evaluations of On Animals: Volume 1, Systematic Theology by Margaret Adams, Christopher Carter, David Fergusson, and Stephen Webb, this article argues that the theological reappraisals of key doctrines argued for in the book are important for an adequate theological discussion of animals. The article addresses critical points raised by these authors in relation to the creation of human beings in the image of God, the doctrine of the incarnation, the theological ordering of creatures, anthropocentrism, and the doctrine of God. It concludes that, given previous neglect, much more discussion by theologians is required in order to think better concerning the place of animals in Christian theology, but acting better toward fellow animal creatures is an important next step toward this goal.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Clough, D. (2014). On Thinking Theologically About Animals: A Response. Zygon, 49(3), 764-71. DOI: 10.1111/zygo.12119
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Zygon
Publication Date:
26-Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/605410
DOI:
10.1111/zygo.12119
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/zygo.12119/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Clough, D. (2014). On Thinking Theologically About Animals: A Response. Zygon, 49(3), 764-71. DOI: 10.1111/zygo.12119, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/zygo.12119/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving
EISSN:
1467-9744
Appears in Collections:
Theology and Religious Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorClough, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-15T08:30:07Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-15T08:30:07Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08-26en
dc.identifier.citationClough, D. (2014). On Thinking Theologically About Animals: A Response. Zygon, 49(3), 764-71. DOI: 10.1111/zygo.12119en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/zygo.12119en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/605410en
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Clough, D. (2014). On Thinking Theologically About Animals: A Response. Zygon, 49(3), 764-71. DOI: 10.1111/zygo.12119, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/zygo.12119/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archivingen
dc.description.abstractIn response to evaluations of On Animals: Volume 1, Systematic Theology by Margaret Adams, Christopher Carter, David Fergusson, and Stephen Webb, this article argues that the theological reappraisals of key doctrines argued for in the book are important for an adequate theological discussion of animals. The article addresses critical points raised by these authors in relation to the creation of human beings in the image of God, the doctrine of the incarnation, the theological ordering of creatures, anthropocentrism, and the doctrine of God. It concludes that, given previous neglect, much more discussion by theologians is required in order to think better concerning the place of animals in Christian theology, but acting better toward fellow animal creatures is an important next step toward this goal.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/zygo.12119/abstracten
dc.subjectTheologyen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.titleOn Thinking Theologically about Animals: A Responseen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1467-9744en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalZygonen
dc.date.accepted2000-01-01en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderxxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxxen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-08-26en
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