Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/605094
Title:
Preparing to write
Authors:
Chapman, Hazel M.
Abstract:
This chapter explores the following topics: • The psychology of writing • How to reduce stress and anxiety • Why writing is important for learning • Why do you want to write well? • A space of one’s own • Getting started and finishing well • Reading for writing – and other learning resources • Using feedback and accessing support This chapter begins by looking at how your thoughts and feelings about writing, especially writing for assessment, can affect your behaviour. Through understanding what makes you write or prevents you from writing, you can gain control over your writing behaviours, the behaviours that are key to your ultimate performance. This chapter shows the small, simple steps you can take in order to achieve your writing potential. By exploring how to break down the barriers to writing, such as stress and anxiety, this chapter shows how writing can eventually become just another activity, and even an enjoyable habit. We discuss the reasons why writing is important for helping you to learn, and help you to explore your own reasons for wanting to write. This will help you to keep writing, even when you are finding it challenging. The environment you work in is important for developing good writing habits and enabling you to write well, so the chapter discusses how you can create your own writing den and find your favourite writing haunts. Practical tips, such as where to find your ideas from, how to start writing, how to finish your writing session, and how to plan writing for assessment are included. Suggestions on using different sources of information and inspiration for your writing, how to use feedback to improve your writing, and how to get the most from university student support services are given. Writing is an important part of your life when you are studying in health and social care. This chapter helps you to put it into perspective alongside the rest of your life, so that you can approach the act of writing without fear, and develop your writing skills to achieve your full potential in your chosen field within health and social care.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Chapman, H. M. (2013). Preparing to write. In J. Keeling, H. M. Chapman, & J. Williams (Eds.), How to write well: A guide for students of health and social care (pp. 5-28). Maidenhead, United Kingdom: McGraw-Hill / Open University Press.
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill / Open University Press
Publication Date:
3-Sep-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/605094
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
The psychology of writing
ISBN:
9780335244935
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Hazel M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-12T11:05:08Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-12T11:05:08Zen
dc.date.issued2013-09-03en
dc.identifier.citationChapman, H. M. (2013). Preparing to write. In J. Keeling, H. M. Chapman, & J. Williams (Eds.), How to write well: A guide for students of health and social care (pp. 5-28). Maidenhead, United Kingdom: McGraw-Hill / Open University Press.en
dc.identifier.isbn9780335244935en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/605094en
dc.descriptionThe psychology of writingen
dc.description.abstractThis chapter explores the following topics: • The psychology of writing • How to reduce stress and anxiety • Why writing is important for learning • Why do you want to write well? • A space of one’s own • Getting started and finishing well • Reading for writing – and other learning resources • Using feedback and accessing support This chapter begins by looking at how your thoughts and feelings about writing, especially writing for assessment, can affect your behaviour. Through understanding what makes you write or prevents you from writing, you can gain control over your writing behaviours, the behaviours that are key to your ultimate performance. This chapter shows the small, simple steps you can take in order to achieve your writing potential. By exploring how to break down the barriers to writing, such as stress and anxiety, this chapter shows how writing can eventually become just another activity, and even an enjoyable habit. We discuss the reasons why writing is important for helping you to learn, and help you to explore your own reasons for wanting to write. This will help you to keep writing, even when you are finding it challenging. The environment you work in is important for developing good writing habits and enabling you to write well, so the chapter discusses how you can create your own writing den and find your favourite writing haunts. Practical tips, such as where to find your ideas from, how to start writing, how to finish your writing session, and how to plan writing for assessment are included. Suggestions on using different sources of information and inspiration for your writing, how to use feedback to improve your writing, and how to get the most from university student support services are given. Writing is an important part of your life when you are studying in health and social care. This chapter helps you to put it into perspective alongside the rest of your life, so that you can approach the act of writing without fear, and develop your writing skills to achieve your full potential in your chosen field within health and social care.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMcGraw-Hill / Open University Pressen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectWritingen
dc.subjectHealth and social careen
dc.titlePreparing to writeen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2000-01-01en
or.grant.openaccessNoen
rioxxterms.funderxxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxxen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2213-09-03en
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