Death by effectiveness: exercise as medicine caught in the efficacy trap!

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/605023
Title:
Death by effectiveness: exercise as medicine caught in the efficacy trap!
Authors:
Beedie, Chris; Mann, Steven; Jimenez, Alfonso; Kennedy, Lynne; Lane, Andrew M.; Domone, Sarah; Wilson, Stephen; Whyte, Greg
Abstract:
Sport and Exercise Medicine (SEM) has had a good run. For a while it was the low-cost magic bullet. With efficacy demonstrated in study after study, the conclusion was clear: ‘Exercise is Medicine’, a potential public health panacea. Sadly, the early promise waned. While we continue to be bombarded by original research and reviews extoling the efficacy of exercise, there is an apparent dearth of evidence of its effectiveness. This fact is highlighted in 2014 reports from the UK Government1 and Public Health England.2
Affiliation:
Aberystwyth University; ukactive Research Institute; Universidad Europea; University of Chester; University of Wolverhampton; Liverpool John Moores University
Citation:
Beedie, C., Mann, S., Jimenez, A., Kennedy, L., Lane, A. M., Domone, S., Wilson, S., Whyte, G. (2015). Death by effectiveness: exercise as medicine caught in the efficacy trap! British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50(6), 323-4. DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094389
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing Group
Journal:
British Journal of Sports Medicine
Publication Date:
12-Feb-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/605023
DOI:
10.1136/bjsports-2014-094389
Additional Links:
http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2015/02/12/bjsports-2014-094389.full
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1473-0480
Appears in Collections:
Clinical Sciences and Nutrition

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBeedie, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorMann, Stevenen
dc.contributor.authorJimenez, Alfonsoen
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Lynneen
dc.contributor.authorLane, Andrew M.en
dc.contributor.authorDomone, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorWhyte, Gregen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-11T14:56:30Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-11T14:56:30Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02-12en
dc.identifier.citationBeedie, C., Mann, S., Jimenez, A., Kennedy, L., Lane, A. M., Domone, S., Wilson, S., Whyte, G. (2015). Death by effectiveness: exercise as medicine caught in the efficacy trap! British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50(6), 323-4. DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094389en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsports-2014-094389en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/605023en
dc.description.abstractSport and Exercise Medicine (SEM) has had a good run. For a while it was the low-cost magic bullet. With efficacy demonstrated in study after study, the conclusion was clear: ‘Exercise is Medicine’, a potential public health panacea. Sadly, the early promise waned. While we continue to be bombarded by original research and reviews extoling the efficacy of exercise, there is an apparent dearth of evidence of its effectiveness. This fact is highlighted in 2014 reports from the UK Government1 and Public Health England.2en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2015/02/12/bjsports-2014-094389.fullen
dc.subjectExerciseen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectEffectivenessen
dc.subjectHealth behavioursen
dc.titleDeath by effectiveness: exercise as medicine caught in the efficacy trap!en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1473-0480en
dc.contributor.departmentAberystwyth University; ukactive Research Institute; Universidad Europea; University of Chester; University of Wolverhampton; Liverpool John Moores Universityen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Sports Medicineen
dc.date.accepted2015-01-21en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderxxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxxen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2215-02-12en
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