Self-efficacy for temptations is a better predictor of weight loss than motivation and global self-efficacy: Evidence from two prospective studies among overweight/obese women at high risk of breast cancer.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/605004
Title:
Self-efficacy for temptations is a better predictor of weight loss than motivation and global self-efficacy: Evidence from two prospective studies among overweight/obese women at high risk of breast cancer.
Authors:
Armitage, Christopher J.; Wright, Claire E.; Parfitt, Gaynor; Pegington, Mary; Donnelly, Louise S.; Harvie, Michelle N.
Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: Identifying predictors of weight loss could help to triage people who will benefit most from programs and identify those who require additional support. The present research was designed to address statistical, conceptual and operational difficulties associated with the role of self-efficacy in predicting weight loss. METHODS: In Study 1, 115 dieting overweight/obese women at high risk of breast cancer were weighed and completed questionnaires assessing motivation, global self-efficacy and self-efficacy for temptations. The main outcome measure was weight, measured 3-months post-baseline. Study 2 was identical (n=107), except changes in psychological variables were computed, and used to predict weight 6-months post-baseline. RESULTS: In Study 1, self-efficacy for temptations was a significant predictor of weight loss at 3-month follow-up. In Study 2, improved self-efficacy for temptations between baseline and four-weeks was predictive of lower weight at 6 months. CONCLUSION: The key finding was that self-efficacy for temptations, as opposed to motivation and global self-efficacy, was predictive of subsequent weight loss. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The implication is that augmenting dieters' capability for dealing with temptations might boost the impact of weight loss programs.
Affiliation:
University of Manchester; University of Chester; University of South Australia; University Hospital South Manchester
Citation:
Armitage, C. J., Wright, C., Parfitt, G., Pegington, M., Donnelly, L. S., Harvie, M. N. (2014). Self-efficacy for temptations is a better predictor of weight loss than motivation and global self-efficacy: Evidence from two prospective studies among overweight/obese women at high risk of breast cancer. Patient Education and Counselling, 95(2), 254–258. DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2014.01.015
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Patient Education and Counseling
Publication Date:
3-Feb-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/605004
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2014.01.015
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0738399114000500; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24569179
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1873-5134
Appears in Collections:
Clinical Sciences and Nutrition

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorArmitage, Christopher J.en
dc.contributor.authorWright, Claire E.en
dc.contributor.authorParfitt, Gaynoren
dc.contributor.authorPegington, Maryen
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Louise S.en
dc.contributor.authorHarvie, Michelle N.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-11T13:15:59Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-11T13:15:59Zen
dc.date.issued2014-02-03en
dc.identifier.citationArmitage, C. J., Wright, C., Parfitt, G., Pegington, M., Donnelly, L. S., Harvie, M. N. (2014). Self-efficacy for temptations is a better predictor of weight loss than motivation and global self-efficacy: Evidence from two prospective studies among overweight/obese women at high risk of breast cancer. Patient Education and Counselling, 95(2), 254–258. DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2014.01.015en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pec.2014.01.015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/605004en
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Identifying predictors of weight loss could help to triage people who will benefit most from programs and identify those who require additional support. The present research was designed to address statistical, conceptual and operational difficulties associated with the role of self-efficacy in predicting weight loss. METHODS: In Study 1, 115 dieting overweight/obese women at high risk of breast cancer were weighed and completed questionnaires assessing motivation, global self-efficacy and self-efficacy for temptations. The main outcome measure was weight, measured 3-months post-baseline. Study 2 was identical (n=107), except changes in psychological variables were computed, and used to predict weight 6-months post-baseline. RESULTS: In Study 1, self-efficacy for temptations was a significant predictor of weight loss at 3-month follow-up. In Study 2, improved self-efficacy for temptations between baseline and four-weeks was predictive of lower weight at 6 months. CONCLUSION: The key finding was that self-efficacy for temptations, as opposed to motivation and global self-efficacy, was predictive of subsequent weight loss. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The implication is that augmenting dieters' capability for dealing with temptations might boost the impact of weight loss programs.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0738399114000500en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24569179en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectIntentionen
dc.subjectObeseen
dc.subjectOverweighten
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen
dc.subjectWeight lossen
dc.titleSelf-efficacy for temptations is a better predictor of weight loss than motivation and global self-efficacy: Evidence from two prospective studies among overweight/obese women at high risk of breast cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1873-5134en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Manchester; University of Chester; University of South Australia; University Hospital South Manchesteren
dc.identifier.journalPatient Education and Counselingen
dc.date.accepted2014-01-26en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderxxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxxen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2214-01-26en
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