Stakeholders’ perceptions of the benefit of introducing an Australian Intermediary System for vulnerable witnesses

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604953
Title:
Stakeholders’ perceptions of the benefit of introducing an Australian Intermediary System for vulnerable witnesses
Authors:
Powell, Martine B.; Bowden, Phoebe; Mattison, Michelle L. A.
Abstract:
Vulnerable witnesses (e.g. children and adults with communication impairment) face many barriers to testifying and achieving justice when participating in the criminal justice system. To date, reforms have been implemented in Australia to address these, yet the barriers remain. Several other countries have implemented an intermediary scheme, whereby an independent third party assists vulnerable witnesses to understand the questions and processes encountered during interviews and trials, and helps witnesses to be understood. This study provides a qualitative analysis of stakeholders’ (N¼25 professionals) perceptions regarding the potential benefits of implementing an intermediary scheme in Australia. While all participants demonstrated an open-minded attitude to new reform in this area, their perspectives did not support the introduction of an intermediary scheme at this time. Stakeholders highlighted the need for improved use and effectiveness of current measures, and expressed concern about adding further complication to the system.
Affiliation:
Deakin University; Lancaster University
Citation:
Powell, M. B., Bowden, P., & Mattison, M. L. (2014). Stakeholders' perceptions of the benefit of introducing an Australian intermediary system for vulnerable witnesses. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 48(4), 498-512. DOI: 0004865814543391.
Publisher:
SAGE
Journal:
Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology
Publication Date:
14-Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604953
Additional Links:
http://anj.sagepub.com/content/48/4/498.abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1837-9273
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Martine B.en
dc.contributor.authorBowden, Phoebeen
dc.contributor.authorMattison, Michelle L. A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-11T09:38:27Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-11T09:38:27Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08-14en
dc.identifier.citationPowell, M. B., Bowden, P., & Mattison, M. L. (2014). Stakeholders' perceptions of the benefit of introducing an Australian intermediary system for vulnerable witnesses. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 48(4), 498-512. DOI: 0004865814543391.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604953en
dc.description.abstractVulnerable witnesses (e.g. children and adults with communication impairment) face many barriers to testifying and achieving justice when participating in the criminal justice system. To date, reforms have been implemented in Australia to address these, yet the barriers remain. Several other countries have implemented an intermediary scheme, whereby an independent third party assists vulnerable witnesses to understand the questions and processes encountered during interviews and trials, and helps witnesses to be understood. This study provides a qualitative analysis of stakeholders’ (N¼25 professionals) perceptions regarding the potential benefits of implementing an intermediary scheme in Australia. While all participants demonstrated an open-minded attitude to new reform in this area, their perspectives did not support the introduction of an intermediary scheme at this time. Stakeholders highlighted the need for improved use and effectiveness of current measures, and expressed concern about adding further complication to the system.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://anj.sagepub.com/content/48/4/498.abstracten
dc.subjectRegistered Intermediaryen
dc.subjectVulnerable witnessesen
dc.titleStakeholders’ perceptions of the benefit of introducing an Australian Intermediary System for vulnerable witnessesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1837-9273en
dc.contributor.departmentDeakin University; Lancaster Universityen
dc.identifier.journalAustralian & New Zealand Journal of Criminologyen
dc.date.accepted2000-01-01en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderxxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxxen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2214-08-14en
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