Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604752
Title:
Why I Didn't Go Down to the Delta
Authors:
Duffett, Mark
Abstract:
Analysing the television documentary Rick Stein Tastes the Blues for common perceptions of the Delta, this book chapter explores ethical dilemmas associated with a particular music tourism. White visitors celebrate the black music heritage of what is still one of the poorest regions of the USA, but to what extent are they fetishizing poverty? The chapter argues that we can position blues pilgrimages as a form of cross-racial dark tourism. As a way to share concern for racialized creativity in the face of social neglect, blues pilgrimage has become a matter of empathetically hearing of black woe expressed and white guilt displaced by music from a different time, place and culture.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Duffett, M. (2014). ‘Why I didn’t go down to the Delta: The cultural politics of blues tourism,’ in S. Cohen, R. Knifton, M. Leonard & L. Roberts (eds.) Sites of popular music heritage: Memories, histories, places (pp. 239-255). New York, NY: Routledge.
Publisher:
Routledge
Publication Date:
25-Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604752
Additional Links:
https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415824507
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9780415824507
Appears in Collections:
Media

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDuffett, Marken
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T15:31:57Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-07T15:31:57Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09-25en
dc.identifier.citationDuffett, M. (2014). ‘Why I didn’t go down to the Delta: The cultural politics of blues tourism,’ in S. Cohen, R. Knifton, M. Leonard & L. Roberts (eds.) Sites of popular music heritage: Memories, histories, places (pp. 239-255). New York, NY: Routledge.en
dc.identifier.isbn9780415824507en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604752en
dc.description.abstractAnalysing the television documentary Rick Stein Tastes the Blues for common perceptions of the Delta, this book chapter explores ethical dilemmas associated with a particular music tourism. White visitors celebrate the black music heritage of what is still one of the poorest regions of the USA, but to what extent are they fetishizing poverty? The chapter argues that we can position blues pilgrimages as a form of cross-racial dark tourism. As a way to share concern for racialized creativity in the face of social neglect, blues pilgrimage has become a matter of empathetically hearing of black woe expressed and white guilt displaced by music from a different time, place and culture.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/products/9780415824507en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectbluesen
dc.subjectfan pilgrimageen
dc.subjectblack musicen
dc.subjectpopular musicen
dc.titleWhy I Didn't Go Down to the Deltaen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2000-01-01en
or.grant.openaccessNoen
rioxxterms.funderxxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxxen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2214-09-25en
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