Teachers' self-efficacy, perceived effectiveness beliefs, and reported use of cognitive-behavioral approaches to bullying among pupils: Effects of in-service training with the I DECIDE program.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604709
Title:
Teachers' self-efficacy, perceived effectiveness beliefs, and reported use of cognitive-behavioral approaches to bullying among pupils: Effects of in-service training with the I DECIDE program.
Authors:
Boulton, Michael J.
Abstract:
Despite the promise of being effective in tacking bullying and conduct disorder, cognitive-behavioral (C-B) interventions are underused by teachers. Little detailed information exists as to why this is the case. The current study with junior school teachers in the U.K. (N = 249) confirmed this low reported usage and showed that while teachers tended to believe that C-B approaches would be effective, most held rather low self-efficacy beliefs. Attending a workshop on a specific C-B approach, the I DECIDE program had positive effects on perceived effectiveness and self-efficacy beliefs, and longer durations of training (3 days) were more beneficial than shorter durations (half/1 day). In line with outcome-expectancy theory and the theory of planned behavior, self-efficacy and duration of training predicted an increase in reported usage of I DECIDE across an 8-month period, and self-efficacy fully mediated the association between duration of training and increase in reported usage. The implications of these findings for overcoming impediments to the more widespread use of C-B approaches by teachers to tackling bullying were discussed, particularly the notion that attending training of sufficient duration coupled with a more explicit attention on fostering self-efficacy will pay dividends.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Boulton, M. J. (2014). Teachers' self-efficacy, perceived effectiveness beliefs, and reported use of cognitive-behavioral approaches to bullying among pupils: Effects of in-service training with the I DECIDE program. Behavior Therapy, 45(3), 328-343. DOI: 10.1016/j.beth.2013.12.004
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Behavior Therapy
Publication Date:
14-Dec-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604709
DOI:
10.1016/j.beth.2013.12.004
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005789413001354
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1878-1888
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBoulton, Michael J.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T10:44:28Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-07T10:44:28Zen
dc.date.issued2013-12-14en
dc.identifier.citationBoulton, M. J. (2014). Teachers' self-efficacy, perceived effectiveness beliefs, and reported use of cognitive-behavioral approaches to bullying among pupils: Effects of in-service training with the I DECIDE program. Behavior Therapy, 45(3), 328-343. DOI: 10.1016/j.beth.2013.12.004en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.beth.2013.12.004en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604709en
dc.description.abstractDespite the promise of being effective in tacking bullying and conduct disorder, cognitive-behavioral (C-B) interventions are underused by teachers. Little detailed information exists as to why this is the case. The current study with junior school teachers in the U.K. (N = 249) confirmed this low reported usage and showed that while teachers tended to believe that C-B approaches would be effective, most held rather low self-efficacy beliefs. Attending a workshop on a specific C-B approach, the I DECIDE program had positive effects on perceived effectiveness and self-efficacy beliefs, and longer durations of training (3 days) were more beneficial than shorter durations (half/1 day). In line with outcome-expectancy theory and the theory of planned behavior, self-efficacy and duration of training predicted an increase in reported usage of I DECIDE across an 8-month period, and self-efficacy fully mediated the association between duration of training and increase in reported usage. The implications of these findings for overcoming impediments to the more widespread use of C-B approaches by teachers to tackling bullying were discussed, particularly the notion that attending training of sufficient duration coupled with a more explicit attention on fostering self-efficacy will pay dividends.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005789413001354en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectCBTen
dc.subjectBullyingen
dc.subjectTeachersen
dc.titleTeachers' self-efficacy, perceived effectiveness beliefs, and reported use of cognitive-behavioral approaches to bullying among pupils: Effects of in-service training with the I DECIDE program.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1878-1888en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalBehavior Therapyen
dc.date.accepted2013-12-06en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderxxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxxen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2213-12-14en
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