Using magnetic nanoparticles for gene transfer to neural stem cells: stem cell propagation method influences outcomes

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604637
Title:
Using magnetic nanoparticles for gene transfer to neural stem cells: stem cell propagation method influences outcomes
Authors:
Pickard, Mark R.; Adams, Christopher F.; Barraud, Perrine; Chari, Divya M.
Abstract:
Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplants offer a key strategy to augment neural repair by releasing therapeutic biomolecules into injury sites. Genetic modification of NSCs is heavily reliant on viral vectors but cytotoxic effects have prompted development of non-viral alternatives, such as magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs). NSCs are propagated in laboratories as either 3-D suspension "neurospheres" or 2-D adherent "monolayers". MNPs deployed with oscillating magnetic fields ("magnetofection technology") mediate effective gene transfer to neurospheres but the efficacy of this approach for monolayers is unknown. It is important to address this issue as oscillating magnetic fields dramatically enhance MNP-based transfection in transplant cells (e.g., astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors) propagated as monolayers. We report for the first time that oscillating magnetic fields enhanced MNP-based transfection with reporter and functional (basic fibroblast growth factor; FGF2) genes in monolayer cultures yielding high transfection versus neurospheres. Transfected NSCs showed high viability and could re-form neurospheres, which is important as neurospheres yield higher post-transplantation viability versus monolayer cells. Our results demonstrate that the combination of oscillating magnetic fields and a monolayer format yields the highest efficacy for MNP-mediated gene transfer to NSCs, offering a viable non-viral alternative for genetic modification of this important neural cell transplant population.
Affiliation:
Keele University, United Kingdom; University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Citation:
Pickard, M. R., Adams, C. F., Barraud, P., & Chari, D. M. (2015). Using magnetic nanoparticles for gene transfer to neural stem cells: stem cell propagation method influences outcomes. Journal of Functional Biomaterials, 6(2), 259-76. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jfb6020259
Publisher:
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Journal:
Journal of Functional Biomaterials
Publication Date:
24-Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604637
DOI:
10.3390/jfb6020259
Additional Links:
http://www.mdpi.com/2079-4983/6/2/259
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2079-4983
Sponsors:
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK; Doctoral Training Centre in Regenerative Medicine, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, UK
Appears in Collections:
Institute of Medicine

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPickard, Mark R.en
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Christopher F.en
dc.contributor.authorBarraud, Perrineen
dc.contributor.authorChari, Divya M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-06T15:29:06Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-06T15:29:06Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04-24en
dc.identifier.citationPickard, M. R., Adams, C. F., Barraud, P., & Chari, D. M. (2015). Using magnetic nanoparticles for gene transfer to neural stem cells: stem cell propagation method influences outcomes. Journal of Functional Biomaterials, 6(2), 259-76. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jfb6020259en
dc.identifier.issn2079-4983en
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/jfb6020259en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604637en
dc.description.abstractGenetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplants offer a key strategy to augment neural repair by releasing therapeutic biomolecules into injury sites. Genetic modification of NSCs is heavily reliant on viral vectors but cytotoxic effects have prompted development of non-viral alternatives, such as magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs). NSCs are propagated in laboratories as either 3-D suspension "neurospheres" or 2-D adherent "monolayers". MNPs deployed with oscillating magnetic fields ("magnetofection technology") mediate effective gene transfer to neurospheres but the efficacy of this approach for monolayers is unknown. It is important to address this issue as oscillating magnetic fields dramatically enhance MNP-based transfection in transplant cells (e.g., astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors) propagated as monolayers. We report for the first time that oscillating magnetic fields enhanced MNP-based transfection with reporter and functional (basic fibroblast growth factor; FGF2) genes in monolayer cultures yielding high transfection versus neurospheres. Transfected NSCs showed high viability and could re-form neurospheres, which is important as neurospheres yield higher post-transplantation viability versus monolayer cells. Our results demonstrate that the combination of oscillating magnetic fields and a monolayer format yields the highest efficacy for MNP-mediated gene transfer to NSCs, offering a viable non-viral alternative for genetic modification of this important neural cell transplant population.en
dc.description.sponsorshipBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK; Doctoral Training Centre in Regenerative Medicine, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, UKen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Instituteen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/2079-4983/6/2/259en
dc.subjectnanoparticleen
dc.subjectmagnetofectionen
dc.subjectneural cellen
dc.subjectstem cellen
dc.subjecttransplantationen
dc.subjectgenetic engineeringen
dc.titleUsing magnetic nanoparticles for gene transfer to neural stem cells: stem cell propagation method influences outcomesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKeele University, United Kingdom; University of Cambridge, United Kingdomen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Functional Biomaterialsen
dc.date.accepted2015-04-16en
or.grant.openaccessNoen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2216-02-24en
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