Inadvertent environmentalism and the action–value opportunity: reflections from studies at both ends of the generational spectrum

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604611
Title:
Inadvertent environmentalism and the action–value opportunity: reflections from studies at both ends of the generational spectrum
Authors:
Hitchings, Russell; Collins, Rebecca; Day, Rosie
Abstract:
A recent turn towards a more contextually sensitive apprehension of the challenge of making everyday life less resource hungry has been partly underwritten by widespread evidence that the environmental values people commonly profess to hold do not often translate into correspondingly low impact actions. Yet sometimes the contexts of everyday life can also conspire to make people limit their consumption without ever explicitly connecting this to the environmental agenda. This paper considers this phenomenon with reference to UK studies from both ends of the generational spectrum. The first questioned how older people keep warm at home during winter and the second examined how young people get rid of no longer wanted possessions. Both found that, though the respondents involved were acting in certain ways that may be deemed comparatively low impact, they were hitherto relatively indifferent to the idea of characterising these actions as such. We outline three ways in which sustainability advocates might respond to the existence of such “inadvertent environmentalists” and consider how they might inspire studies that generate fresh intervention ideas instead of lingering on the dispiriting recognition that people do not often feel able to act for the environment.
Affiliation:
University College London; University of Chester; University of Birmingham
Citation:
Hitchings, R., Collins, R., & Day, R. (2015). Inadvertent environmentalism and the action–value opportunity: reflections from studies at both ends of the generational spectrum. Local Environment, 20(3), 369-385. DOI: 10.1080/13549839.2013.852524
Publisher:
Routledge
Journal:
Local Environment
Publication Date:
22-Nov-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604611
DOI:
10.1080/13549839.2013.852524
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13549839.2013.852524
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Local Environment on 22/11/2013, available online: doi: 10.1080/13549839.2013.852524
EISSN:
1469-6711
Sponsors:
Nuffield Foundation/Economic and Social Research Council
Appears in Collections:
Geography and Development Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHitchings, Russellen
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Rebeccaen
dc.contributor.authorDay, Rosieen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-06T13:25:23Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-06T13:25:23Zen
dc.date.issued2013-11-22en
dc.identifier.citationHitchings, R., Collins, R., & Day, R. (2015). Inadvertent environmentalism and the action–value opportunity: reflections from studies at both ends of the generational spectrum. Local Environment, 20(3), 369-385. DOI: 10.1080/13549839.2013.852524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13549839.2013.852524en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604611en
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Local Environment on 22/11/2013, available online: doi: 10.1080/13549839.2013.852524en
dc.description.abstractA recent turn towards a more contextually sensitive apprehension of the challenge of making everyday life less resource hungry has been partly underwritten by widespread evidence that the environmental values people commonly profess to hold do not often translate into correspondingly low impact actions. Yet sometimes the contexts of everyday life can also conspire to make people limit their consumption without ever explicitly connecting this to the environmental agenda. This paper considers this phenomenon with reference to UK studies from both ends of the generational spectrum. The first questioned how older people keep warm at home during winter and the second examined how young people get rid of no longer wanted possessions. Both found that, though the respondents involved were acting in certain ways that may be deemed comparatively low impact, they were hitherto relatively indifferent to the idea of characterising these actions as such. We outline three ways in which sustainability advocates might respond to the existence of such “inadvertent environmentalists” and consider how they might inspire studies that generate fresh intervention ideas instead of lingering on the dispiriting recognition that people do not often feel able to act for the environment.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNuffield Foundation/Economic and Social Research Councilen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13549839.2013.852524en
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.en
dc.subjectConsumptionen
dc.subjectSustainabilityen
dc.subjectValue-action gapen
dc.subjectYoung peopleen
dc.subjectOlder peopleen
dc.titleInadvertent environmentalism and the action–value opportunity: reflections from studies at both ends of the generational spectrumen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1469-6711en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College London; University of Chester; University of Birminghamen
dc.identifier.journalLocal Environmenten
dc.date.accepted2013-09-25en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2213-11-22en
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