Building blocks: structural contexts and carved stones

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604609
Title:
Building blocks: structural contexts and carved stones
Authors:
Gondek, Meggen M.
Abstract:
Early medieval carved stones can be many things: landscape monuments, churchyard monuments or memorials, grave markers, architectural elements usually in churches or public commemorative statements to name a few (not exclusive) functions. However, there are also hints that carved stones could be part of settlement micro-landscapes built into or next to buildings or forts. This paper looks at a range of archaeological contexts for the use of early medieval carved stones in structural (non-church related) contexts in Britain. This small group of monuments includes both the more ‘public’ structural monuments on display and ‘hidden’ monuments built into structures and not visible. These monuments are explored in this paper in terms of memory, movement and performance – where engagement could be both habitual behaviour and part of specific events of social practice and memory. The spatial and depositional dimensions will be explored and how routine, even possibly mundane, engagement with stones in these settings may offer a different perspective on how monuments can be part of the process of memorisation and selective forgetting.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Gondek, M. (2015). Building blocks: structural contexts and carved stones. In H. Williams, J. Kirton & M. Gondek (Eds.), Early Medieval Stone Monuments: Materiality, Biography, Landscape (pp. 87-112). Boydell and Brewer.
Publisher:
Boydell and Brewer
Publication Date:
17-Sep-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604609
Additional Links:
http://www.boydellandbrewer.com/store/viewItem.asp?idProduct=14947
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781783270743
Appears in Collections:
History and Archaeology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGondek, Meggen M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-06T10:33:58Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-06T10:33:58Zen
dc.date.issued2015-09-17en
dc.identifier.citationGondek, M. (2015). Building blocks: structural contexts and carved stones. In H. Williams, J. Kirton & M. Gondek (Eds.), Early Medieval Stone Monuments: Materiality, Biography, Landscape (pp. 87-112). Boydell and Brewer.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781783270743en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604609en
dc.description.abstractEarly medieval carved stones can be many things: landscape monuments, churchyard monuments or memorials, grave markers, architectural elements usually in churches or public commemorative statements to name a few (not exclusive) functions. However, there are also hints that carved stones could be part of settlement micro-landscapes built into or next to buildings or forts. This paper looks at a range of archaeological contexts for the use of early medieval carved stones in structural (non-church related) contexts in Britain. This small group of monuments includes both the more ‘public’ structural monuments on display and ‘hidden’ monuments built into structures and not visible. These monuments are explored in this paper in terms of memory, movement and performance – where engagement could be both habitual behaviour and part of specific events of social practice and memory. The spatial and depositional dimensions will be explored and how routine, even possibly mundane, engagement with stones in these settings may offer a different perspective on how monuments can be part of the process of memorisation and selective forgetting.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBoydell and Breweren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.boydellandbrewer.com/store/viewItem.asp?idProduct=14947en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectMaterial Cultureen
dc.subjectPictish stonesen
dc.subjectLandscapeen
dc.titleBuilding blocks: structural contexts and carved stonesen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
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