Author Response: Provocative Education: From Buddhism for Busy People® to Dismal Land ®

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604443
Title:
Author Response: Provocative Education: From Buddhism for Busy People® to Dismal Land ®
Authors:
Wall, Tony
Abstract:
When we engage with Žižekian thought, we might conceptualise contemporary education as part of wider machinery to perpetuate and deepen the grasp capitalism has in a globalising world (also see Furedi, 2006, 2010). We might see how ideas, knowledge, and ‘everything else’ (c.f. Hawking, 2001, 2007) can and is packaged up into forms that are easily consumed by audiences buying the educational objects. Such processes of commodification actively render objects to the audience for sale, and appear across all spheres of human activity; this is why we must remember that according to some philosophical stances, the signified has a slippery relationship with the signifier (c.f. Lacau and Mouffee, 1985). Three examples help animate this phenomenon and some of the different consequences of it. The first example illustrates how commodification can apply to areas of life that we might think of as difficult to capture spiritually or experientially: now, for time-poor people who want to quickly reap the existential benefits of Buddhism, there is a wide range of easily accessible texts at affordable prices to choose from. Titles include “Buddhism for Busy People”, “Buddhism Plain and Simple”, “The Little Book of Buddhism”, “Buddhism Made Simple”, “Buddhism: for Beginners!”, “Buddhism for Dummies”, “Sit Like A Buddha”, “Hurry Up and Meditate”, “Enlightenment to Go”, and “The Dalai Lama's Cat”. In and through such texts, commodified versions of Buddhism appear, much the same way as Buddha-like statues appear in NASA photos of Mars (Feltman, 2015).
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Wall, T. (2016). Author Response: Provocative Education: From Buddhism for Busy People® to Dismal Land ®. Studies in Philosophy and Education, 35(6), 649-53.
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Studies in Philosophy and Education
Publication Date:
11-Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604443
DOI:
10.1007/s11217-016-9521-8
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11217-016-9521-8
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11217-016-9521-8
ISSN:
0039-3746
EISSN:
1573-191X
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Work Related Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWall, Tonyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-05T09:28:00Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-05T09:28:00Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-11en
dc.identifier.citationWall, T. (2016). Author Response: Provocative Education: From Buddhism for Busy People® to Dismal Land ®. Studies in Philosophy and Education, 35(6), 649-53.en
dc.identifier.issn0039-3746en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11217-016-9521-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604443en
dc.descriptionThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11217-016-9521-8en
dc.description.abstractWhen we engage with Žižekian thought, we might conceptualise contemporary education as part of wider machinery to perpetuate and deepen the grasp capitalism has in a globalising world (also see Furedi, 2006, 2010). We might see how ideas, knowledge, and ‘everything else’ (c.f. Hawking, 2001, 2007) can and is packaged up into forms that are easily consumed by audiences buying the educational objects. Such processes of commodification actively render objects to the audience for sale, and appear across all spheres of human activity; this is why we must remember that according to some philosophical stances, the signified has a slippery relationship with the signifier (c.f. Lacau and Mouffee, 1985). Three examples help animate this phenomenon and some of the different consequences of it. The first example illustrates how commodification can apply to areas of life that we might think of as difficult to capture spiritually or experientially: now, for time-poor people who want to quickly reap the existential benefits of Buddhism, there is a wide range of easily accessible texts at affordable prices to choose from. Titles include “Buddhism for Busy People”, “Buddhism Plain and Simple”, “The Little Book of Buddhism”, “Buddhism Made Simple”, “Buddhism: for Beginners!”, “Buddhism for Dummies”, “Sit Like A Buddha”, “Hurry Up and Meditate”, “Enlightenment to Go”, and “The Dalai Lama's Cat”. In and through such texts, commodified versions of Buddhism appear, much the same way as Buddha-like statues appear in NASA photos of Mars (Feltman, 2015).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11217-016-9521-8en
dc.subjectZizeken
dc.subjectprovocative educationen
dc.subjectworkplace learningen
dc.titleAuthor Response: Provocative Education: From Buddhism for Busy People® to Dismal Land ®en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1573-191Xen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalStudies in Philosophy and Educationen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-03-11en
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