Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604084
Title:
Peptide-Dependent Recognition of HLA-B*57:01 by KIR3DS1
Authors:
O'Connor, Geraldine M.; Vivian, Julian P.; Gostick, Emma; Pymm, Phillip; Lafont, Bernard A.; Price, David A.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Brooks, Andrew G.; McVicar, Daniel W.
Abstract:
Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) play an important role in the activation of natural killer (NK) cells, which in turn contribute to the effective immune control of many viral infections. In the context of HIV infection, the closely related KIR3DL1 and KIR3DS1 molecules, in particular, have been associated with disease outcome. Inhibitory signals via KIR3DL1 are disrupted by downregulation of HLA class I ligands on the infected cell surface and can also be impacted by changes in the presented peptide repertoire. In contrast, the activatory ligands for KIR3DS1 remain obscure. We used a structure-driven approach to define the characteristics of HLA class I-restricted peptides that interact with KIR3DL1 and KIR3DS1. In the case of HLAB*57:01, we used this knowledge to identify bona fide HIV-derived peptide epitopes with similar properties. Two such peptides facilitated productive interactions between HLA-B*57:01 and KIR3DS1. These data reveal the presence of KIR3DS1 ligands within the HIV-specific peptide repertoire presented by a protective HLA class I allotype, thereby enhancing our mechanistic understanding of the processes that enable NK cells to impact disease outcome.
Affiliation:
Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, Maryland, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Non-Human Primate Immunogenetics and Cellular Immunology Unit, Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom Human Immunology Section, Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Citation:
O'Connor, G. M., Vivian, J. P., Gostick, E., Pymm, P., Lafont, B. A. P., Price, ... McVicar, D. W. (2015). Peptide-dependent recognition of HLA-B*57:01 by KIR3DS1. Journal of Virology, 89:5213–5221. doi:10.1128/JVI.03586-14.
Publisher:
American Society for Microbiology
Journal:
Journal of Virology
Publication Date:
Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604084
DOI:
10.1128/JVI.03586-14
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Description:
Gold OA
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Geraldine M.en
dc.contributor.authorVivian, Julian P.en
dc.contributor.authorGostick, Emmaen
dc.contributor.authorPymm, Phillipen
dc.contributor.authorLafont, Bernard A.en
dc.contributor.authorPrice, David A.en
dc.contributor.authorRossjohn, Jamieen
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Andrew G.en
dc.contributor.authorMcVicar, Daniel W.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-31T08:48:39Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-31T08:48:39Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03en
dc.identifier.citationO'Connor, G. M., Vivian, J. P., Gostick, E., Pymm, P., Lafont, B. A. P., Price, ... McVicar, D. W. (2015). Peptide-dependent recognition of HLA-B*57:01 by KIR3DS1. Journal of Virology, 89:5213–5221. doi:10.1128/JVI.03586-14.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.03586-14en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604084en
dc.descriptionGold OAen
dc.description.abstractKiller cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) play an important role in the activation of natural killer (NK) cells, which in turn contribute to the effective immune control of many viral infections. In the context of HIV infection, the closely related KIR3DL1 and KIR3DS1 molecules, in particular, have been associated with disease outcome. Inhibitory signals via KIR3DL1 are disrupted by downregulation of HLA class I ligands on the infected cell surface and can also be impacted by changes in the presented peptide repertoire. In contrast, the activatory ligands for KIR3DS1 remain obscure. We used a structure-driven approach to define the characteristics of HLA class I-restricted peptides that interact with KIR3DL1 and KIR3DS1. In the case of HLAB*57:01, we used this knowledge to identify bona fide HIV-derived peptide epitopes with similar properties. Two such peptides facilitated productive interactions between HLA-B*57:01 and KIR3DS1. These data reveal the presence of KIR3DS1 ligands within the HIV-specific peptide repertoire presented by a protective HLA class I allotype, thereby enhancing our mechanistic understanding of the processes that enable NK cells to impact disease outcome.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen
dc.subjectNatural Killer Cellsen
dc.subjectKIRen
dc.subjectHIVen
dc.titlePeptide-Dependent Recognition of HLA-B*57:01 by KIR3DS1en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, Maryland, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Non-Human Primate Immunogenetics and Cellular Immunology Unit, Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom Human Immunology Section, Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Virologyen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.