Eating Behaviours of British University Students: A Cluster Analysis on a Neglected Issue

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604073
Title:
Eating Behaviours of British University Students: A Cluster Analysis on a Neglected Issue
Authors:
Tanton, Jina; Dodd, Lorna; Woodfield, Lorayne; Mabhala, Mzwandile A.
Abstract:
Unhealthy diet is a primary risk factor for noncommunicable diseases. University student populations are known to engage in health risking lifestyle behaviours including risky eating behaviours. The purpose of this study was to examine eating behaviour patterns in a population of British university students using a two-step cluster analysis. Consumption prevalence of snack, convenience, and fast foods in addition to fruit and vegetables was measured using a self-report “Student Eating Behaviours” questionnaire on 345 undergraduate university students. Four clusters were identified: “risky eating behaviours,” “mixed eating behaviours,” “moderate eating behaviours,” and “favourable eating behaviours.” Nineteen percent of students were categorised as having “favourable eating behaviours” whilst just under a third of students were categorised within the two most risky clusters. Riskier eating behaviour patterns were associated with living on campus and Christian faith. The findings of this study highlight the importance of university microenvironments on eating behaviours in university student populations. Religion as a mediator of eating behaviours is a novel finding.
Affiliation:
Newman University; University of Chester
Citation:
Tanton, L., Dodd, L., Woodfield, L., & Mabhala, M. A. (2015). Eating Behaviours of British University Students: A Cluster Analysis on a Neglected Issue. Advances in Preventive Medicine, 2015. DOI: 10.1155/2015/639239
Publisher:
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Journal:
Advances in Preventive Medicine
Publication Date:
13-Oct-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/604073
DOI:
10.1155/2015/639239
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26550495; http://www.hindawi.com/journals/apm/2015/639239/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
2090-3499
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTanton, Jinaen
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Lornaen
dc.contributor.authorWoodfield, Lorayneen
dc.contributor.authorMabhala, Mzwandile A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-31T15:20:55Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-31T15:20:55Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10-13en
dc.identifier.citationTanton, L., Dodd, L., Woodfield, L., & Mabhala, M. A. (2015). Eating Behaviours of British University Students: A Cluster Analysis on a Neglected Issue. Advances in Preventive Medicine, 2015. DOI: 10.1155/2015/639239en
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2015/639239en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/604073en
dc.description.abstractUnhealthy diet is a primary risk factor for noncommunicable diseases. University student populations are known to engage in health risking lifestyle behaviours including risky eating behaviours. The purpose of this study was to examine eating behaviour patterns in a population of British university students using a two-step cluster analysis. Consumption prevalence of snack, convenience, and fast foods in addition to fruit and vegetables was measured using a self-report “Student Eating Behaviours” questionnaire on 345 undergraduate university students. Four clusters were identified: “risky eating behaviours,” “mixed eating behaviours,” “moderate eating behaviours,” and “favourable eating behaviours.” Nineteen percent of students were categorised as having “favourable eating behaviours” whilst just under a third of students were categorised within the two most risky clusters. Riskier eating behaviour patterns were associated with living on campus and Christian faith. The findings of this study highlight the importance of university microenvironments on eating behaviours in university student populations. Religion as a mediator of eating behaviours is a novel finding.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHindawi Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26550495en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hindawi.com/journals/apm/2015/639239/en
dc.subjectEating Behavioursen
dc.subjectStudentsen
dc.subjectPrevalenceen
dc.subjectClusteren
dc.titleEating Behaviours of British University Students: A Cluster Analysis on a Neglected Issueen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2090-3499en
dc.contributor.departmentNewman University; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalAdvances in Preventive Medicineen
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