The Impact of Post-Writer Histories on the Significance of UK Literary Houses

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/603924
Title:
The Impact of Post-Writer Histories on the Significance of UK Literary Houses
Authors:
Pardoe, James
Abstract:
By exploring case studies from the UK, this paper investigates how post-writer histories of literary houses impact on the understanding of the lives and works of associated writers. The boundaries of this paper have been dictated by its place within twenty-first century manifestations of the survival, conservation and reproduction of literary houses associated with three writers active in the early nineteenth century: Lord Byron, John Keats and Sir Walter Scott. Many of the works within the literary house genre highlight the significance of the link between writers and their audiences. These links are created through the establishment of houses as sites of remembrance, as memorials, and as sensory markers. However, whereas commentators concentrate on the links being direct, this paper shows that the association is based on narratives filtered through those who were subsequently responsible for the houses. Consequently, the interpretation prevalent in the houses in the twenty-first century are the result of a long history based on the writers, and what was considered their significance by others over approximately two hundred years
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Pardoe, J. (2014). The Impact of Post-Writer Histories on the Significance of UK Literary Houses. The International Journal of Literary Humanities, 11(1), 27-40.
Publisher:
Common Ground
Journal:
The International Journal of Literary Humanities
Publication Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/603924
Additional Links:
http://ijhl.cgpublisher.com/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
2327-8676
Appears in Collections:
History and Archaeology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPardoe, Jamesen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T14:44:15Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T14:44:15Zen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationPardoe, J. (2014). The Impact of Post-Writer Histories on the Significance of UK Literary Houses. The International Journal of Literary Humanities, 11(1), 27-40.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/603924en
dc.description.abstractBy exploring case studies from the UK, this paper investigates how post-writer histories of literary houses impact on the understanding of the lives and works of associated writers. The boundaries of this paper have been dictated by its place within twenty-first century manifestations of the survival, conservation and reproduction of literary houses associated with three writers active in the early nineteenth century: Lord Byron, John Keats and Sir Walter Scott. Many of the works within the literary house genre highlight the significance of the link between writers and their audiences. These links are created through the establishment of houses as sites of remembrance, as memorials, and as sensory markers. However, whereas commentators concentrate on the links being direct, this paper shows that the association is based on narratives filtered through those who were subsequently responsible for the houses. Consequently, the interpretation prevalent in the houses in the twenty-first century are the result of a long history based on the writers, and what was considered their significance by others over approximately two hundred yearsen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCommon Grounden
dc.relation.urlhttp://ijhl.cgpublisher.com/en
dc.subjectLiterary housesen
dc.subjectconservationen
dc.subjectinterpretationen
dc.subjectauraen
dc.subjectmemorialsen
dc.subjectsensory markersen
dc.titleThe Impact of Post-Writer Histories on the Significance of UK Literary Housesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2327-8676en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalThe International Journal of Literary Humanitiesen
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