Enhanced threat detection in experienced riot police officers: Cognitive evidence from the face-in-the-crowd effect

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/601440
Title:
Enhanced threat detection in experienced riot police officers: Cognitive evidence from the face-in-the-crowd effect
Authors:
Damjanovic, Ljubica; Pinkham, Amy E.; Clarke, Philip; Phillips, Jeremy
Abstract:
We explored how varying levels of professional expertise in hostile crowd management could enhance threat detection capabilities as assessed by the face in the crowd paradigm. Trainee police officers and more experienced police officers specialized in, and having extensive experience with, riot control, were compared with participants with no experience in hostile crowd management on their search times and accuracy levels in detecting angry and happy face targets against a display of emotional and neutral dis- tractor faces. The experienced officers relative to their trainee counterparts and nonpolice controls showed enhanced detection for threatening faces in both types of display along with a greater degree of inhibitory control over angry face distractors. These findings help to reinforce the ecological validity of the face in the crowd paradigm and provide a new theoretical link for the role of individual differences on the attentional processing of socially relevant stimuli.
Affiliation:
University of Chester; Southern Methodist University
Citation:
Damjanovic, L., Pinkham, A. E., Clarke, P., & Phillips, J. (2014). Enhanced threat detection in experienced riot police officers: Cognitive evidence from the face-in-the-crowd effect. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 67(5), 1004–1018. doi:10.1080/17470218.2013.839724
Publisher:
Routledge Taylor & Francis Group
Journal:
The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Publication Date:
24-Oct-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/601440
DOI:
10.1080/17470218.2013.839724
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/citedby/10.1080/17470218.2013.839724
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology on 24/10/2013, available online: doi: 10.1080/17470218.2013.839724
EISSN:
1747-0226
Sponsors:
Funded by the Small Research Grants Scheme [grant number SRG/SP-S] awarded to the first and last authors from the Research and Knowledge Transfer Office at the University of Chester, http://www.chester.ac.uk/business-support-services/rkt-office
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDamjanovic, Ljubicaen
dc.contributor.authorPinkham, Amy E.en
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Philipen
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Jeremyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-16T17:07:48Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-16T17:07:48Zen
dc.date.issued2013-10-24en
dc.identifier.citationDamjanovic, L., Pinkham, A. E., Clarke, P., & Phillips, J. (2014). Enhanced threat detection in experienced riot police officers: Cognitive evidence from the face-in-the-crowd effect. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 67(5), 1004–1018. doi:10.1080/17470218.2013.839724en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17470218.2013.839724en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/601440en
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology on 24/10/2013, available online: doi: 10.1080/17470218.2013.839724en
dc.description.abstractWe explored how varying levels of professional expertise in hostile crowd management could enhance threat detection capabilities as assessed by the face in the crowd paradigm. Trainee police officers and more experienced police officers specialized in, and having extensive experience with, riot control, were compared with participants with no experience in hostile crowd management on their search times and accuracy levels in detecting angry and happy face targets against a display of emotional and neutral dis- tractor faces. The experienced officers relative to their trainee counterparts and nonpolice controls showed enhanced detection for threatening faces in both types of display along with a greater degree of inhibitory control over angry face distractors. These findings help to reinforce the ecological validity of the face in the crowd paradigm and provide a new theoretical link for the role of individual differences on the attentional processing of socially relevant stimuli.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by the Small Research Grants Scheme [grant number SRG/SP-S] awarded to the first and last authors from the Research and Knowledge Transfer Office at the University of Chester, http://www.chester.ac.uk/business-support-services/rkt-officeen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledge Taylor & Francis Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/citedby/10.1080/17470218.2013.839724en
dc.subjectVisual searchen
dc.subjectFacial emotionen
dc.subjectAttentionen
dc.subjectThreat detectionen
dc.subjectPolicingen
dc.titleEnhanced threat detection in experienced riot police officers: Cognitive evidence from the face-in-the-crowd effecten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1747-0226en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; Southern Methodist Universityen
dc.identifier.journalThe Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychologyen
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