Ethics and influences in tourist perceptions of climate change

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/601376
Title:
Ethics and influences in tourist perceptions of climate change
Authors:
Hindley, Ann; Font, Xavier
Abstract:
Ethical decisions to visit disappearing destinations are self-serving and influences feed into self-interest. Data were collected from a sample of pre-, during- and post-visit tourists to Venice and Svalbard, using expressive techniques and scenarios using the Hunt–Vitell model to understand ethical decisions, and the constructive technique and collage to understand influences. The results show that travel decisions are driven by individual selfishness, and any threat to freedom (i.e. the right to travel) is underplayed. The preferred scenario for long-term benefit for planet and people is via short-term economic and social negative impacts on the destination’s locals, rather than the tourists’ own experience. Respondents believe that they are blameless for their purchasing habits as they lack perceived behavioural control, and instead corporations ought to be providing sustainable products as the norm and not sell products that harm. In the scenarios, where respondents express concern for the locals in a disappearing destination (i.e. if we do not visit, they will not benefit from our expenditure), individual selfishness to visit could be the driver, rather than an altruistic act to provide support. Theoretical and policy implications are discussed.
Citation:
Hindley, A. & Font, X. (2014). Ethics and influences in tourist perceptions of climate change. Current issues in tourism, 1-17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2014.946477
Publisher:
Routledge
Journal:
Current Issues in Tourism
Publication Date:
11-Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/601376
DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2014.946477
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2014.946477
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Chester Business School

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHindley, Annen
dc.contributor.authorFont, Xavieren
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-16T11:17:40Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-16T11:17:40Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08-11en
dc.identifier.citationHindley, A. & Font, X. (2014). Ethics and influences in tourist perceptions of climate change. Current issues in tourism, 1-17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2014.946477en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2014.946477en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/601376en
dc.description.abstractEthical decisions to visit disappearing destinations are self-serving and influences feed into self-interest. Data were collected from a sample of pre-, during- and post-visit tourists to Venice and Svalbard, using expressive techniques and scenarios using the Hunt–Vitell model to understand ethical decisions, and the constructive technique and collage to understand influences. The results show that travel decisions are driven by individual selfishness, and any threat to freedom (i.e. the right to travel) is underplayed. The preferred scenario for long-term benefit for planet and people is via short-term economic and social negative impacts on the destination’s locals, rather than the tourists’ own experience. Respondents believe that they are blameless for their purchasing habits as they lack perceived behavioural control, and instead corporations ought to be providing sustainable products as the norm and not sell products that harm. In the scenarios, where respondents express concern for the locals in a disappearing destination (i.e. if we do not visit, they will not benefit from our expenditure), individual selfishness to visit could be the driver, rather than an altruistic act to provide support. Theoretical and policy implications are discussed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2014.946477en
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjectclimateen
dc.subjectbehavioural intentionsen
dc.subjectethicsen
dc.subjectweather perceptionsen
dc.titleEthics and influences in tourist perceptions of climate changeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Issues in Tourismen
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