Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/600856
Title:
Coach behaviour analysis within elite youth soccer
Authors:
Worsfold, Paul R.
Abstract:
Soccer clubs recruit talented youth players into their development programmes with the aim of nurturing their ability, and ultimately to develop them into professional soccer players (Carling et al. 2012). Past talent identification and development research has identified that youth players, who are then selected to play at higher standards of competition, possess greater endurance capacity (Gil et al. 2007; Reilly et al. 2000), faster sprinting performance (Le Gall et al. 2010), have faster dribbling performance (Huijgen et al. 2009) and are generally more physically advanced in comparison to players of lower ability (Gravina et al. 2008). In contrast to traditional measures, few studies have considered player development in relation to coach-player interaction. There is general agreement that coaching is a process that primarily focuses on aiding athletes in achieving their peak performance (Woodman, 1993). Therefore, the way in which a coach facilitates learning through their words and actions, which is the core principal of the coach’s instructional behavior, can strongly impact upon an athletes’ performance and progression, as well as their emotional well-being (Miller, 1992). Promoting a mastery climate, with equal opportunities and support for athletes fosters group cohesion and reduces performance anxiety through the reduction of social pressures (Smith et al. 2007). Despite the need for equality to promote team cohesion throughout the team, differentiation between feedback provided to effective and non-effective team sport players has previously been identified. In many team sports, it has been suggested that coaches observe and interact more with effective players (based upon match time), provide more feedback (instructional, positive, and negative), and give more positive evaluations within training sessions when compared to non-effective players (Markland & Martinek, 1988; Wang et al. 2001; Rosado & Mesquita, 2009). To date no research has conducted a longitudinal assessment focusing on talent development and player progression through coach behaviour analysis within elite youth soccer. Therefore, the aim of the study was to objectively analyse coaching behaviour within three playing squads at an elite level soccer club during two competitive seasons.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Worsfold, P. R. (2013). Coach behaviour analysis within elite youth soccer. In D. M. Peters & P. O'Donoghue (Eds.), Performance Analysis of Sport IX (pp. 17-22). London, United Kingdom: Routledge.
Publisher:
Routledge
Publication Date:
23-Jul-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/600856
Additional Links:
https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415643399
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Coach behaviour; soccer
ISBN:
9780415643399
Appears in Collections:
Sport and Exercise Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWorsfold, Paul R.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T10:59:02Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-08T10:59:02Zen
dc.date.issued2013-07-23en
dc.identifier.citationWorsfold, P. R. (2013). Coach behaviour analysis within elite youth soccer. In D. M. Peters & P. O'Donoghue (Eds.), Performance Analysis of Sport IX (pp. 17-22). London, United Kingdom: Routledge.en
dc.identifier.isbn9780415643399en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/600856en
dc.description.abstractSoccer clubs recruit talented youth players into their development programmes with the aim of nurturing their ability, and ultimately to develop them into professional soccer players (Carling et al. 2012). Past talent identification and development research has identified that youth players, who are then selected to play at higher standards of competition, possess greater endurance capacity (Gil et al. 2007; Reilly et al. 2000), faster sprinting performance (Le Gall et al. 2010), have faster dribbling performance (Huijgen et al. 2009) and are generally more physically advanced in comparison to players of lower ability (Gravina et al. 2008). In contrast to traditional measures, few studies have considered player development in relation to coach-player interaction. There is general agreement that coaching is a process that primarily focuses on aiding athletes in achieving their peak performance (Woodman, 1993). Therefore, the way in which a coach facilitates learning through their words and actions, which is the core principal of the coach’s instructional behavior, can strongly impact upon an athletes’ performance and progression, as well as their emotional well-being (Miller, 1992). Promoting a mastery climate, with equal opportunities and support for athletes fosters group cohesion and reduces performance anxiety through the reduction of social pressures (Smith et al. 2007). Despite the need for equality to promote team cohesion throughout the team, differentiation between feedback provided to effective and non-effective team sport players has previously been identified. In many team sports, it has been suggested that coaches observe and interact more with effective players (based upon match time), provide more feedback (instructional, positive, and negative), and give more positive evaluations within training sessions when compared to non-effective players (Markland & Martinek, 1988; Wang et al. 2001; Rosado & Mesquita, 2009). To date no research has conducted a longitudinal assessment focusing on talent development and player progression through coach behaviour analysis within elite youth soccer. Therefore, the aim of the study was to objectively analyse coaching behaviour within three playing squads at an elite level soccer club during two competitive seasons.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCoach behaviouren
dc.relation.ispartofseriessocceren
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/products/9780415643399en
dc.subjectcoachen
dc.subjectbehavioren
dc.subjectsocceren
dc.titleCoach behaviour analysis within elite youth socceren
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
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