Contested spaces, new opportunities: displacement, return and the rural economy in Casamance, Senegal

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/600713
Title:
Contested spaces, new opportunities: displacement, return and the rural economy in Casamance, Senegal
Authors:
Evans, Martin
Abstract:
Casamance is the southwesternmost part of Senegal, largely separated from the rest of the country by The Gambia to the north and bordering Guinea-Bissau to the south. As the scene of West Africa’s longest-running civil conflict, now some 30 years old, Casamance provides a case of displacement economies on a relatively small scale but of long duration. The focus here is on human displacement, understood as the enforced physical dislocation of people, the dynamics of their return and resettlement, and the economic, political and social effects related to these processes. Much of the long-term human displacement in the conflict has occurred in the relatively narrow band of territory between the south bank of the Casamance River and northern border districts of Guinea-Bissau. Following flight and protracted exile from this border area in the 1990s, however, the 2000s and beyond have mostly seen people return, driven by economic and social desperation coupled with generally improved (though still at times volatile) security conditions, and supported by international aid for reconstruction. Building on field research conducted over twelve years, the chapter considers the emergent economic and political landscape of the border area. It shows how this landscape is the result of layers of displacement over two decades, situated within a deeper historical context of migration. From a theoretical perspective, it seeks to understand these dynamics through the concept of ‘relational space’, formulated in human geography and beginning to be used, if not always explicitly, in studies of displacement.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Evans, M. (2014). Contested spaces, new opportunities: displacement, return and the rural economy in Casamance, Senegal. In A. Hammar (Ed.), Displacement economies: paradoxes of crisis and creativity in African contexts (pp. 57-78). London, United Kingdom: Zed Books.
Publisher:
Zed Books
Publication Date:
8-May-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/600713
Additional Links:
http://zedbooks.co.uk/node/22805
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781780324883
Sponsors:
British Academy Small Research Grant ref. SG-50255
Appears in Collections:
Geography and Development Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Martinen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-07T14:24:45Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-07T14:24:45Zen
dc.date.issued2014-05-08en
dc.identifier.citationEvans, M. (2014). Contested spaces, new opportunities: displacement, return and the rural economy in Casamance, Senegal. In A. Hammar (Ed.), Displacement economies: paradoxes of crisis and creativity in African contexts (pp. 57-78). London, United Kingdom: Zed Books.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781780324883en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/600713en
dc.description.abstractCasamance is the southwesternmost part of Senegal, largely separated from the rest of the country by The Gambia to the north and bordering Guinea-Bissau to the south. As the scene of West Africa’s longest-running civil conflict, now some 30 years old, Casamance provides a case of displacement economies on a relatively small scale but of long duration. The focus here is on human displacement, understood as the enforced physical dislocation of people, the dynamics of their return and resettlement, and the economic, political and social effects related to these processes. Much of the long-term human displacement in the conflict has occurred in the relatively narrow band of territory between the south bank of the Casamance River and northern border districts of Guinea-Bissau. Following flight and protracted exile from this border area in the 1990s, however, the 2000s and beyond have mostly seen people return, driven by economic and social desperation coupled with generally improved (though still at times volatile) security conditions, and supported by international aid for reconstruction. Building on field research conducted over twelve years, the chapter considers the emergent economic and political landscape of the border area. It shows how this landscape is the result of layers of displacement over two decades, situated within a deeper historical context of migration. From a theoretical perspective, it seeks to understand these dynamics through the concept of ‘relational space’, formulated in human geography and beginning to be used, if not always explicitly, in studies of displacement.en
dc.description.sponsorshipBritish Academy Small Research Grant ref. SG-50255en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherZed Booksen
dc.relation.urlhttp://zedbooks.co.uk/node/22805en
dc.subjectdisplacementen
dc.subjectconflicten
dc.subjectSenegalen
dc.subjectCasamanceen
dc.titleContested spaces, new opportunities: displacement, return and the rural economy in Casamance, Senegalen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.