Bridging the gap – an exploration of the use of positive action

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/600619
Title:
Bridging the gap – an exploration of the use of positive action
Authors:
Davies, Chantal ( 0000-0002-0532-7366 ) ; Robison, Muriel
Abstract:
Despite laws in Britain permitting limited positive action initiatives to combat disadvantage faced by minority groups in employment since the mid-1970s, the subject has notoriously been a neglected and highly controversial area in the UK. Notwithstanding the potential provided by sections 158 and 159 of the Equality Act 2010, it still appears that organizations prefer to steer clear of this opportunity to address disadvantage suffered by protected groups. Whilst there is a body of work considering the theoretical importance of positive action in the UK (see inter alia Barmes, 2011; Burrows & Robison, 2006; Johns et al, 2014; McCrudden 1986; Noon, 2010), there is a lack of empirical exploration of the practical implications of these provisions. Qualitative study to determine the utility of the positive action provisions is considered both timely and necessary as we approach the fifth anniversary of the Equality Act 2010. This paper will explore the theoretical context of the current positive action provisions within England, Scotland and Wales. It will also discuss the early findings of a small-scale qualitative study carried out by the authors looking at the experiences of a purposive sample of public and private organisations in light of the potential for positive action in relation to employment in the UK.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Davies, C. & Robison, M. (2015, June). Bridging the gap – an exploration of the use of positive action. Paper presented at the Equality Act 2010: 5 years on Conference at University of Chester, Chester,
Publication Date:
Jun-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/600619
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Law

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Chantalen
dc.contributor.authorRobison, Murielen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-04T15:19:17Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-04T15:19:17Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06en
dc.identifier.citationDavies, C. & Robison, M. (2015, June). Bridging the gap – an exploration of the use of positive action. Paper presented at the Equality Act 2010: 5 years on Conference at University of Chester, Chester,en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/600619en
dc.description.abstractDespite laws in Britain permitting limited positive action initiatives to combat disadvantage faced by minority groups in employment since the mid-1970s, the subject has notoriously been a neglected and highly controversial area in the UK. Notwithstanding the potential provided by sections 158 and 159 of the Equality Act 2010, it still appears that organizations prefer to steer clear of this opportunity to address disadvantage suffered by protected groups. Whilst there is a body of work considering the theoretical importance of positive action in the UK (see inter alia Barmes, 2011; Burrows & Robison, 2006; Johns et al, 2014; McCrudden 1986; Noon, 2010), there is a lack of empirical exploration of the practical implications of these provisions. Qualitative study to determine the utility of the positive action provisions is considered both timely and necessary as we approach the fifth anniversary of the Equality Act 2010. This paper will explore the theoretical context of the current positive action provisions within England, Scotland and Wales. It will also discuss the early findings of a small-scale qualitative study carried out by the authors looking at the experiences of a purposive sample of public and private organisations in light of the potential for positive action in relation to employment in the UK.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectpositive actionen
dc.subjectequalityen
dc.subjectEquality Act 2010en
dc.titleBridging the gap – an exploration of the use of positive actionen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
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