Language attitudes and divergence on the Merseyside/Lancashire border

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/600501
Title:
Language attitudes and divergence on the Merseyside/Lancashire border
Authors:
West, Helen
Abstract:
Recent sociolinguistic studies have argued that speaker identity is accentuated in borer regions due to speakers’ desire to project a strong sense of identity (Llamas 2007, 2010; Britain 2010). Following the Local Government Act in 1972, the creation of the administrative county of Merseyside provides us with fertile ground for the study of the relationship between language variation and regional identity. This chapter investigates the diffusion of fronted Liverpool NURSE (Wells 1982), in Southport (Merseyside) and Ormskirk (South Lancashire) demonstrating that, in comparison to Ormskirk, despite the administrative and socioeconomic links with Liverpool, the Liverpool accent is not spreading to Southport as might be hypothesised by existing models of diffusion of linguistic change. I explore possible explanations for the variation between Southport and Ormskirk with particular reference to speaker attitude in relation to the negative perception of the Liverpool accent.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
West, H. (2015). Language attitudes and divergence on the Merseyside/Lancashire border. In R. Hickey (Eds.) Researching Northern English (pp. 317-341). Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins Publishing Company.
Publisher:
John Benjamins Publishing Company
Publication Date:
16-Dec-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/600501
Additional Links:
https://benjamins.com/#catalog/books/veaw.g55/main
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9789027249159
Appears in Collections:
English

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWest, Helenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-02T19:10:12Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-02T19:10:12Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12-16en
dc.identifier.citationWest, H. (2015). Language attitudes and divergence on the Merseyside/Lancashire border. In R. Hickey (Eds.) Researching Northern English (pp. 317-341). Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins Publishing Company.en
dc.identifier.isbn9789027249159en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/600501en
dc.description.abstractRecent sociolinguistic studies have argued that speaker identity is accentuated in borer regions due to speakers’ desire to project a strong sense of identity (Llamas 2007, 2010; Britain 2010). Following the Local Government Act in 1972, the creation of the administrative county of Merseyside provides us with fertile ground for the study of the relationship between language variation and regional identity. This chapter investigates the diffusion of fronted Liverpool NURSE (Wells 1982), in Southport (Merseyside) and Ormskirk (South Lancashire) demonstrating that, in comparison to Ormskirk, despite the administrative and socioeconomic links with Liverpool, the Liverpool accent is not spreading to Southport as might be hypothesised by existing models of diffusion of linguistic change. I explore possible explanations for the variation between Southport and Ormskirk with particular reference to speaker attitude in relation to the negative perception of the Liverpool accent.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Companyen
dc.relation.urlhttps://benjamins.com/#catalog/books/veaw.g55/mainen
dc.subjectLanguage variation and changeen
dc.subjectvowel mergersen
dc.subjectattitude and identityen
dc.subjectbordersen
dc.titleLanguage attitudes and divergence on the Merseyside/Lancashire borderen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
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