Perceived Stress, Thinking Style and Paranormal Belief

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/600499
Title:
Perceived Stress, Thinking Style and Paranormal Belief
Authors:
Lasikiewicz, Nicola
Abstract:
Paranormal beliefs often become stronger in times of stress. Such beliefs have also been found to vary in accordance with thinking style, whereby stronger beliefs are often observed in experiential thinkers. Little research, however, has explored the interaction between perceived stress and thinking style. 82 males and females aged 18 to 62 years (mean = 29.96 ± 12.53 years) completed measures of perceived stress, thinking style (rational and experiential) and paranormal belief. The results revealed stronger beliefs in experiential thinkers, compared with those with a rational thinking style. Perceived stress alone, was not a prominent predictor of belief but the combination of stress and thinking style, specifically high perceived stress with a rational thinking style, significantly predicted greater global paranormal belief, belief in superstition, traditional religious belief, and belief in psi. High perceived stress appeared to facilitate belief in rational thinkers as conversely, belief was lowest in rational thinkers under conditions of low-perceived stress. These findings suggest that stress may lower the propensity for rational thinking and consequently, encourage belief in scientifically unsubstantiated phenomena. This interaction may have implications for coping during stressful situations.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Lasikiewicz, N. (2016). Perceived stress, thinking style, and paranormal belief. Imagination, Cognition and Personality: Consciousness in Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice, 35, 306-320. doi:10.1177/0276236615595235
Journal:
Imagination Cognition and Personality
Publication Date:
Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/600499
DOI:
10.1177/0276236615595235
Additional Links:
https://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/imagination-cognition-and-personality/journal202395
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
02762366
EISSN:
15414477
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLasikiewicz, Nicolaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-02T18:29:23Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-02T18:29:23Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03en
dc.identifier.citationLasikiewicz, N. (2016). Perceived stress, thinking style, and paranormal belief. Imagination, Cognition and Personality: Consciousness in Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice, 35, 306-320. doi:10.1177/0276236615595235en
dc.identifier.issn02762366en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0276236615595235en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/600499en
dc.description.abstractParanormal beliefs often become stronger in times of stress. Such beliefs have also been found to vary in accordance with thinking style, whereby stronger beliefs are often observed in experiential thinkers. Little research, however, has explored the interaction between perceived stress and thinking style. 82 males and females aged 18 to 62 years (mean = 29.96 ± 12.53 years) completed measures of perceived stress, thinking style (rational and experiential) and paranormal belief. The results revealed stronger beliefs in experiential thinkers, compared with those with a rational thinking style. Perceived stress alone, was not a prominent predictor of belief but the combination of stress and thinking style, specifically high perceived stress with a rational thinking style, significantly predicted greater global paranormal belief, belief in superstition, traditional religious belief, and belief in psi. High perceived stress appeared to facilitate belief in rational thinkers as conversely, belief was lowest in rational thinkers under conditions of low-perceived stress. These findings suggest that stress may lower the propensity for rational thinking and consequently, encourage belief in scientifically unsubstantiated phenomena. This interaction may have implications for coping during stressful situations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/imagination-cognition-and-personality/journal202395en
dc.subjectperceived stressen
dc.subjectparanormal beliefen
dc.subjectthinking styleen
dc.subjectrational thinkingen
dc.subjectexperiential thinkingen
dc.titlePerceived Stress, Thinking Style and Paranormal Beliefen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn15414477en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalImagination Cognition and Personalityen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.