Landmarks for the dead: exploring Anglo-Saxon mortuary geographies

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/594429
Title:
Landmarks for the dead: exploring Anglo-Saxon mortuary geographies
Authors:
Semple, Sarah; Williams, Howard ( 0000-0003-3510-6852 )
Abstract:
To move forward with a robust framework for understanding early medieval mortuary geographies, scholars must escape the romantic dichotomy of regarding the early medieval dead as either confined to the dead pagan ‘communities’ situated on the periphery and borders of the living world, or safely bounded within churchyards under Christian pastoral care. While there is widespread recognition of the variability in early medieval burial sites and their spatial components, only a handful of studies have considered them as places of memory within complex and evolving historic landscapes, despite evidence for rich overlapping and changing burial terrains across the period. This chapter offers a new introduction and framework for just such an approach to early medieval mortuary geography.
Affiliation:
Durham University; University of Chester
Citation:
Semple, S. and Williams, H. 2015. Landmarks for the dead: exploring Anglo-Saxon mortuary geographies, in M. Clegg Hyer and G. R. Owen-Crocker (eds) The Material Culture of the Built Environment in the Anglo-Saxon World, Vol. II of The Material Culture of Daily Living in the Anglo-Saxon World, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
Publication Date:
Nov-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/594429
Additional Links:
http://liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/products/60534
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
Book chapter exploring mortuary geography in the Anglo-Saxon world
ISBN:
9781781382653
Appears in Collections:
History and Archaeology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSemple, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Howarden
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-20T18:00:09Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-20T18:00:09Zen
dc.date.issued2015-11en
dc.identifier.citationSemple, S. and Williams, H. 2015. Landmarks for the dead: exploring Anglo-Saxon mortuary geographies, in M. Clegg Hyer and G. R. Owen-Crocker (eds) The Material Culture of the Built Environment in the Anglo-Saxon World, Vol. II of The Material Culture of Daily Living in the Anglo-Saxon World, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781781382653en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/594429en
dc.descriptionBook chapter exploring mortuary geography in the Anglo-Saxon worlden
dc.description.abstractTo move forward with a robust framework for understanding early medieval mortuary geographies, scholars must escape the romantic dichotomy of regarding the early medieval dead as either confined to the dead pagan ‘communities’ situated on the periphery and borders of the living world, or safely bounded within churchyards under Christian pastoral care. While there is widespread recognition of the variability in early medieval burial sites and their spatial components, only a handful of studies have considered them as places of memory within complex and evolving historic landscapes, despite evidence for rich overlapping and changing burial terrains across the period. This chapter offers a new introduction and framework for just such an approach to early medieval mortuary geography.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLiverpool University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/products/60534en
dc.subjectAnglo-Saxon Englanden
dc.subjectAnglo-Saxon cemeteriesen
dc.subjectmortuary practiceen
dc.subjectearly medievalen
dc.titleLandmarks for the dead: exploring Anglo-Saxon mortuary geographiesen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentDurham University; University of Chesteren
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