Psychological flexibility correlates with patient-reported outcomes independent of clinical or sociodemographic characteristics

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/592582
Title:
Psychological flexibility correlates with patient-reported outcomes independent of clinical or sociodemographic characteristics
Authors:
Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; Storey, Lesley
Abstract:
Purpose: The evidence for the effectiveness of psychological interventions for cancer patients is currently unclear. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), which increases individual’s levels of psychological flexibility, may be more effective than other frameworks of psychological intervention, but good quality research is needed to inform adoption and implementation. This study explored the correlation between psychological flexibility and patient reported outcomes to assess the viability of this intervention for cancer survivors. Methods: Recruitment was co-ordinated through a regional cancer centre. 129 respondents completed a cross-sectional postal questionnaire. They were of mixed gender, diagnosis and cancer stage; a mean 61 years old; and a mean 207 days post-diagnosis. Self-report questionnaires assessed psychological flexibility, mood, anxiety, depression, stress, quality of life and benefit finding. Results: Psychological flexibility was a strong and consistent correlate of outcome; effects were maintained even when potentially confounding clinical and socio-demographic characteristics were controlled. Conclusions: Psychological flexibility can be modified through ACT-based interventions. Given the strong correlational evidence found in this study, it seems that such interventions might be useful for cancer survivors. High quality and well-designed controlled trials are now needed to establish effectiveness.
Citation:
Hulbert-Williams, N. J., & Storey, L. (2015). Psychological flexibility correlates with patient-reported outcomes independent of clinical or sociodemographic characteristics. Supportive Care in Cancer. DOI: 10.1007/s00520-015-3050-9
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Supportive Care in Cancer
Publication Date:
17-Dec-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/592582
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-015-3050-9
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00520-015-3050-9
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-015-3050-9
ISSN:
1433-7339
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.en
dc.contributor.authorStorey, Lesleyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-23T15:39:40Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-23T15:39:40Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12-17en
dc.identifier.citationHulbert-Williams, N. J., & Storey, L. (2015). Psychological flexibility correlates with patient-reported outcomes independent of clinical or sociodemographic characteristics. Supportive Care in Cancer. DOI: 10.1007/s00520-015-3050-9en
dc.identifier.issn1433-7339en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00520-015-3050-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/592582en
dc.descriptionThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-015-3050-9en
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The evidence for the effectiveness of psychological interventions for cancer patients is currently unclear. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), which increases individual’s levels of psychological flexibility, may be more effective than other frameworks of psychological intervention, but good quality research is needed to inform adoption and implementation. This study explored the correlation between psychological flexibility and patient reported outcomes to assess the viability of this intervention for cancer survivors. Methods: Recruitment was co-ordinated through a regional cancer centre. 129 respondents completed a cross-sectional postal questionnaire. They were of mixed gender, diagnosis and cancer stage; a mean 61 years old; and a mean 207 days post-diagnosis. Self-report questionnaires assessed psychological flexibility, mood, anxiety, depression, stress, quality of life and benefit finding. Results: Psychological flexibility was a strong and consistent correlate of outcome; effects were maintained even when potentially confounding clinical and socio-demographic characteristics were controlled. Conclusions: Psychological flexibility can be modified through ACT-based interventions. Given the strong correlational evidence found in this study, it seems that such interventions might be useful for cancer survivors. High quality and well-designed controlled trials are now needed to establish effectiveness.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00520-015-3050-9en
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectOncologyen
dc.subjectInterventionen
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen
dc.subjectDistressen
dc.subjectAcceptanceen
dc.titlePsychological flexibility correlates with patient-reported outcomes independent of clinical or sociodemographic characteristicsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSupportive Care in Canceren
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.