‘We do it for the team’ - Student athletes’ initiation practices and their impact on group cohesion.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/592561
Title:
‘We do it for the team’ - Student athletes’ initiation practices and their impact on group cohesion.
Authors:
Lafferty, Moira E.; Wakefield, Caroline; Brown, Hollie
Abstract:
Hazing, or inappropriate initiation activities, are a well-documented occurrence within university sport team societies. This study examined the occurrence of initiation activities in relation to team cohesion. 154 participants completed the Group Environment Questionnaire and the Team Cohesion Questionnaire in relation to initiation activities at their institution. Results revealed that athletes were more aware of appropriate than inappropriate initiation activities, with males being aware of a higher occurrence of inappropriate activities than females. Results were also analysed by sport type, revealing that interactive team sport players recorded higher hazing scores than co-acting players. With regard to cohesion, no significant relationship was found between hazing and cohesion suggesting the notion that initiations enhance cohesion in sport is untrue.
Affiliation:
University of Chester, Liverpool Hope University, Napier University
Citation:
Lafferty, M. E., Wakefield, C., & Brown, H. (2016). “We do it for the team” – Student-athletes’ initiation practices and their impact on group cohesion. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 15(4), 438-446. doi: 10.1080/1612197X.2015.1121507
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Publication Date:
5-Jan-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/592561
DOI:
10.1080/1612197X.2015.1121507
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology in January 2016, available online: doi 10.1080/1612197X.2015.1121507
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLafferty, Moira E.en
dc.contributor.authorWakefield, Carolineen
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Hollieen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-23T11:59:53Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-23T11:59:53Zen
dc.date.issued2016-01-05en
dc.identifier.citationLafferty, M. E., Wakefield, C., & Brown, H. (2016). “We do it for the team” – Student-athletes’ initiation practices and their impact on group cohesion. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 15(4), 438-446. doi: 10.1080/1612197X.2015.1121507en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1612197X.2015.1121507en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/592561en
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology in January 2016, available online: doi 10.1080/1612197X.2015.1121507en
dc.description.abstractHazing, or inappropriate initiation activities, are a well-documented occurrence within university sport team societies. This study examined the occurrence of initiation activities in relation to team cohesion. 154 participants completed the Group Environment Questionnaire and the Team Cohesion Questionnaire in relation to initiation activities at their institution. Results revealed that athletes were more aware of appropriate than inappropriate initiation activities, with males being aware of a higher occurrence of inappropriate activities than females. Results were also analysed by sport type, revealing that interactive team sport players recorded higher hazing scores than co-acting players. With regard to cohesion, no significant relationship was found between hazing and cohesion suggesting the notion that initiations enhance cohesion in sport is untrue.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectStudent athletesen
dc.subjectinitiationsen
dc.subjectcohesionen
dc.subjectinteractingen
dc.subjectcoactingen
dc.title‘We do it for the team’ - Student athletes’ initiation practices and their impact on group cohesion.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester, Liverpool Hope University, Napier Universityen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychologyen
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