Cancer patients’ respect experiences in relation to perceived communication behaviours from hospital staff: analysis of the 2012-2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/592557
Title:
Cancer patients’ respect experiences in relation to perceived communication behaviours from hospital staff: analysis of the 2012-2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey
Authors:
Clucas, Claudine
Abstract:
Purpose: Respect experiences are poorly understood despite respect being central to professionalism in healthcare and patient well-being, and needed for optimal patient care. This study explores which patient-perceived communication behaviours from hospital staff contribute most to cancer patients’ respect experiences and account for variation in their experience by socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Methods: Secondary analysis of data from the 2012-2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey of 45191 patients with a primary cancer diagnosis treated in English National Health Service trusts providing adult acute cancer services who provided data on experienced respect and dignity. Results: Both autonomy-supportive and caring/emotionally sensitive behaviours were associated with reported respect, although the latter showed stronger associations and accounted for most differences in reports of respect between patient groups. Differences in respect were found by gender, race/ethnicity, age, the presence of long-standing conditions, treatment response, time since first treated for cancer (p<.001), employment and type of cancer (p<.05). Conclusions: The study questions the tendency to conceptualise respect primarily in terms of autonomy-supportive behaviours and shows the relative contribution of autonomy-supportive and caring/emotionally sensitive behaviours in explaining disparities in respect experiences. More attention should be paid to affective communication behaviours from hospital staff to reduce disparities in respect experiences.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Clucas, C. (2015). Cancer patients’ respect experiences in relation to perceived communication behaviours from hospital staff: Analysis of the 2012–2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey. Supportive care in cancer: official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, 24(4), 1719-1728. doi: 10.1007/s00520-015-2973-5.
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Supportive Care in Cancer
Publication Date:
Oct-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/592557
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.DOI 10.1007/s00520-015-2973-5
ISSN:
0941-4355
EISSN:
1433-7339
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorClucas, Claudineen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-23T09:39:02Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-23T09:39:02Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10en
dc.identifier.citationClucas, C. (2015). Cancer patients’ respect experiences in relation to perceived communication behaviours from hospital staff: Analysis of the 2012–2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey. Supportive care in cancer: official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, 24(4), 1719-1728. doi: 10.1007/s00520-015-2973-5.en
dc.identifier.issn0941-4355en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/592557en
dc.descriptionThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.DOI 10.1007/s00520-015-2973-5en
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Respect experiences are poorly understood despite respect being central to professionalism in healthcare and patient well-being, and needed for optimal patient care. This study explores which patient-perceived communication behaviours from hospital staff contribute most to cancer patients’ respect experiences and account for variation in their experience by socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Methods: Secondary analysis of data from the 2012-2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey of 45191 patients with a primary cancer diagnosis treated in English National Health Service trusts providing adult acute cancer services who provided data on experienced respect and dignity. Results: Both autonomy-supportive and caring/emotionally sensitive behaviours were associated with reported respect, although the latter showed stronger associations and accounted for most differences in reports of respect between patient groups. Differences in respect were found by gender, race/ethnicity, age, the presence of long-standing conditions, treatment response, time since first treated for cancer (p<.001), employment and type of cancer (p<.05). Conclusions: The study questions the tendency to conceptualise respect primarily in terms of autonomy-supportive behaviours and shows the relative contribution of autonomy-supportive and caring/emotionally sensitive behaviours in explaining disparities in respect experiences. More attention should be paid to affective communication behaviours from hospital staff to reduce disparities in respect experiences.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.subjectRESPECTen
dc.subjectCancer patientsen
dc.subjectCommunication behavioursen
dc.subjectDisparities in care experiencesen
dc.subjectUnited Kingdomen
dc.titleCancer patients’ respect experiences in relation to perceived communication behaviours from hospital staff: analysis of the 2012-2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Surveyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1433-7339en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalSupportive Care in Canceren
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.