Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/592533
Title:
Service user suicides and coroner's inquests
Authors:
Taylor, Paul J.; Corteen, Karen; Morley, Sharon
Abstract:
The expansion of victimology in the 1980s produced a more nuanced understanding of victims and victimisation. Yet responses of government, criminal justice agencies, media and general public to victims are predictably and predominantly focused on victims of ‘conventional crime’. We challenge this perspective, thus widening the victimological lens. We discuss the impact of self-inflicted deaths and subsequent coronial inquests on practitioners working on behalf of the state.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Taylor, P., Corteen, K., & Morley, S. (2013). Service user suicides and coroner's inquests. Criminal Justice Matters, 92(1), 32-33. doi: 10.1080/09627251.2013.805375
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Criminal Justice Matters
Publication Date:
22-May-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/592533
DOI:
10.1080/09627251.2013.805375
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Criminal Justice Matters on 22nd May 2013, available online: DOI:10.1080/09627251.2013.805375
ISSN:
0962-7251
EISSN:
1934-6220
Appears in Collections:
Social and Political Science

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Paul J.en
dc.contributor.authorCorteen, Karenen
dc.contributor.authorMorley, Sharonen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-23T11:15:39Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-23T11:15:39Zen
dc.date.issued2013-05-22en
dc.identifier.citationTaylor, P., Corteen, K., & Morley, S. (2013). Service user suicides and coroner's inquests. Criminal Justice Matters, 92(1), 32-33. doi: 10.1080/09627251.2013.805375en
dc.identifier.issn0962-7251en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09627251.2013.805375en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/592533en
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Criminal Justice Matters on 22nd May 2013, available online: DOI:10.1080/09627251.2013.805375en
dc.description.abstractThe expansion of victimology in the 1980s produced a more nuanced understanding of victims and victimisation. Yet responses of government, criminal justice agencies, media and general public to victims are predictably and predominantly focused on victims of ‘conventional crime’. We challenge this perspective, thus widening the victimological lens. We discuss the impact of self-inflicted deaths and subsequent coronial inquests on practitioners working on behalf of the state.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.subjectvictimisationen
dc.subjecthealth and social care professionalsen
dc.titleService user suicides and coroner's inquestsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1934-6220en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalCriminal Justice Mattersen
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