Evaluation of Follow-Up Effects of the International Child Development Programme on Caregivers in Mozambique

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/582664
Title:
Evaluation of Follow-Up Effects of the International Child Development Programme on Caregivers in Mozambique
Authors:
Skar, Ane-Marthe Solheim; Sherr, Lorraine; Clucas, Claudine; von Tetzchner, Stephen
Abstract:
Parenting programs have been used to good effect in many settings, yet few are systematically introduced and evaluated in developing countries. This study explores the relative long-term effect of participation in the International Child Development Programme (ICDP) in a group of caregivers in Mozambique. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare caregivers who had completed an ICDP course (n = 75) with a sociogeographically matched comparison group participants (n = 62) who had not followed any parenting program. Both groups completed a questionnaire about parenting, attitudes toward the child and the child’s behavior, self-efficacy, life quality, and mental health. The ICDP group reported better parenting skills, fewer conduct problems in their children, and better child adjustment than the comparison group, as well as a shift in physical punishment away from hitting. The ICDP group had higher self-efficacy scores, better health and life quality, and lower scores on mental health difficulties. The follow-up differences between caregivers who had and had not attended the ICDP course indicate that course attendance may result in observable benefits in parenting and mental health scores. The data are cross-sectional and the caregivers were interviewed postintervention only, and more research is therefore needed.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Skar, A.-M. S., Sherr, L., Clucas, C., & von Tetzchner, S. (2014). Evaluation of Follow-Up Effects of the International Child Development Programme on Caregivers in Mozambique. Infants & Young Children, 27(2), 120-135. doi:10.1097/iyc.0000000000000006
Journal:
Infants & Young Children
Publication Date:
Apr-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/582664
DOI:
10.1097/IYC.0000000000000006
Additional Links:
http://journals.lww.com/iycjournal/Abstract/2014/04000/Evaluation_of_Follow_Up_Effects_of_the.4.aspx; http://journals.lww.com/iycjournal/pages/default.aspx
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Infants & Young Children, 27(2), 120-135. doi:10.1097/iyc.0000000000000006.
ISSN:
0896-3746
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSkar, Ane-Marthe Solheimen
dc.contributor.authorSherr, Lorraineen
dc.contributor.authorClucas, Claudineen
dc.contributor.authorvon Tetzchner, Stephenen
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-25T11:01:03Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-25T11:01:03Zen
dc.date.issued2014-04en
dc.identifier.citationSkar, A.-M. S., Sherr, L., Clucas, C., & von Tetzchner, S. (2014). Evaluation of Follow-Up Effects of the International Child Development Programme on Caregivers in Mozambique. Infants & Young Children, 27(2), 120-135. doi:10.1097/iyc.0000000000000006en
dc.identifier.issn0896-3746en
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/IYC.0000000000000006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/582664en
dc.descriptionThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Infants & Young Children, 27(2), 120-135. doi:10.1097/iyc.0000000000000006.en
dc.description.abstractParenting programs have been used to good effect in many settings, yet few are systematically introduced and evaluated in developing countries. This study explores the relative long-term effect of participation in the International Child Development Programme (ICDP) in a group of caregivers in Mozambique. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare caregivers who had completed an ICDP course (n = 75) with a sociogeographically matched comparison group participants (n = 62) who had not followed any parenting program. Both groups completed a questionnaire about parenting, attitudes toward the child and the child’s behavior, self-efficacy, life quality, and mental health. The ICDP group reported better parenting skills, fewer conduct problems in their children, and better child adjustment than the comparison group, as well as a shift in physical punishment away from hitting. The ICDP group had higher self-efficacy scores, better health and life quality, and lower scores on mental health difficulties. The follow-up differences between caregivers who had and had not attended the ICDP course indicate that course attendance may result in observable benefits in parenting and mental health scores. The data are cross-sectional and the caregivers were interviewed postintervention only, and more research is therefore needed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.lww.com/iycjournal/Abstract/2014/04000/Evaluation_of_Follow_Up_Effects_of_the.4.aspxen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.lww.com/iycjournal/pages/default.aspxen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Infants & Young Childrenen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectICDPen
dc.subjectMozambiqueen
dc.subjectparenting programmeen
dc.titleEvaluation of Follow-Up Effects of the International Child Development Programme on Caregivers in Mozambiqueen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInfants & Young Childrenen
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