'Friends as enemies': A sociological analysis of the relationship among touring professional golfers

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/582525
Title:
'Friends as enemies': A sociological analysis of the relationship among touring professional golfers
Authors:
Fry, John; Bloyce, Daniel ( 0000-0003-4114-3588 )
Abstract:
This paper examines the relationship among male touring professional golfers from a figurational sociological standpoint. The paper is based on 20 interviews from players with experience playing at various levels on the EPGA professional tours and a level ‘above’ that. The results indicate a workplace culture where many begin to adopt the attitudes and behaviors that encourage the development of networks of temporary ‘we-group’ alliances. The ‘touring’ aspects of professional golf means many players strive to forge these alliances to help reduce feelings of loneliness, isolation, and homesickness while away for long periods of time. Such stresses are intensified given the globalization of sport generally and the associated increases in labor market migration that has become commonplace. The urge to develop friendship networks constrains players to behave in a manner expected of them rather than in a way that reflects their actual emotions, such as maintaining a positive attitude during difficult times like spells of poor performances and time away from their families. The relationships among players on tour is, however, non-permanent and/or partially changeable. Players are ‘friends’, characterized by togetherness and camaraderie, while, at the same, showing evidence of tensions and conflict as they are ultimately in direct competition with each other for a share of the overall prize money. Key words: professional golf, workplace relations, sport labor migration, figurational sociology, friendship networks
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Fry, J., & Bloyce, D. (2017). 'Friends as enemies': A sociological analysis of the relationship among touring professional golfers. International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 52(3), 336-360. doi:10.1177/1012690215597659
Publisher:
SAGE
Journal:
International Review for the Sociology of Sport
Publication Date:
6-Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/582525
DOI:
10.1177/1012690215597659
Additional Links:
http://irs.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/1012690215597659
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1461-7218
Appears in Collections:
Sport and Exercise Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFry, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorBloyce, Danielen
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-23T14:50:54Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-23T14:50:54Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-06en
dc.identifier.citationFry, J., & Bloyce, D. (2017). 'Friends as enemies': A sociological analysis of the relationship among touring professional golfers. International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 52(3), 336-360. doi:10.1177/1012690215597659en
dc.identifier.issn1461-7218en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1012690215597659en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/582525en
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the relationship among male touring professional golfers from a figurational sociological standpoint. The paper is based on 20 interviews from players with experience playing at various levels on the EPGA professional tours and a level ‘above’ that. The results indicate a workplace culture where many begin to adopt the attitudes and behaviors that encourage the development of networks of temporary ‘we-group’ alliances. The ‘touring’ aspects of professional golf means many players strive to forge these alliances to help reduce feelings of loneliness, isolation, and homesickness while away for long periods of time. Such stresses are intensified given the globalization of sport generally and the associated increases in labor market migration that has become commonplace. The urge to develop friendship networks constrains players to behave in a manner expected of them rather than in a way that reflects their actual emotions, such as maintaining a positive attitude during difficult times like spells of poor performances and time away from their families. The relationships among players on tour is, however, non-permanent and/or partially changeable. Players are ‘friends’, characterized by togetherness and camaraderie, while, at the same, showing evidence of tensions and conflict as they are ultimately in direct competition with each other for a share of the overall prize money. Key words: professional golf, workplace relations, sport labor migration, figurational sociology, friendship networksen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://irs.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/1012690215597659en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Review for the Sociology of Sporten
dc.subjectProfessional golfen
dc.subjectWorkplace relationsen
dc.subjectSport labor migrationen
dc.subjectFigurational sociologyen
dc.subjectFriendship networksen
dc.title'Friends as enemies': A sociological analysis of the relationship among touring professional golfersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInternational Review for the Sociology of Sporten
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