Greater cross-viewer similarity of semantic associations for representational than for abstract artworks

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/581815
Title:
Greater cross-viewer similarity of semantic associations for representational than for abstract artworks
Authors:
Schepman, Astrid ( 0000-0002-7407-362x ) ; Rodway, Paul ( 0000-0002-7667-6782 ) ; Pullen, Sarah J.
Abstract:
It has been shown previously that liking and valence of associations in response to artworks show greater convergence across viewers for representational than for abstract artwork. The current research explored whether the same applies to the semantic content of the associations. We used data gained with an adapted Unique Corporate Association Valence (UCAV) measure, which invited 24 participants to give short verbal responses to 11 abstract and 11 representational artworks. We paired the responses randomly to responses given to the same artwork, and computed semantic similarity scores using UMBC Ebiquity software. This showed significantly greater semantic similarity scores for representational than abstract art. A control analysis, in which responses were randomly paired with responses from the same category (abstract, representational) showed no significant results, ruling out a baseline effect. For both abstract and representational artworks, randomly paired responses resembled each other less than responses from the same artworks, but the effect was much larger for representational artworks. Our work shows that individuals share semantic associations in response to artworks with other viewers to a greater extent when the artwork is representational than abstract. Our novel method shows potential utility for many areas of psychology that aim to understand the semantic convergence of people’s verbal responses, not least aesthetic psychology.
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Chester
Citation:
Schepman, A., Rodway, P., & Pullen, S. J. (2015). Greater cross-viewer similarity of semantic associations for representational than for abstract artworks. Journal of Vision, 15(14):12, 1–6, doi:10.1167/15.14.12.
Publisher:
The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.
Journal:
Journal of Vision
Publication Date:
22-Oct-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/581815
Additional Links:
http://jov.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2466597
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Description:
Journal article. Available as gold open access via the URL given.
ISSN:
1534-7362
Sponsors:
University of Chester internal grant partly funded work towards this article.
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSchepman, Astriden
dc.contributor.authorRodway, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorPullen, Sarah J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-05T14:45:33Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-05T14:45:33Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10-22en
dc.identifier.citationSchepman, A., Rodway, P., & Pullen, S. J. (2015). Greater cross-viewer similarity of semantic associations for representational than for abstract artworks. Journal of Vision, 15(14):12, 1–6, doi:10.1167/15.14.12.en
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/581815en
dc.descriptionJournal article. Available as gold open access via the URL given.en
dc.description.abstractIt has been shown previously that liking and valence of associations in response to artworks show greater convergence across viewers for representational than for abstract artwork. The current research explored whether the same applies to the semantic content of the associations. We used data gained with an adapted Unique Corporate Association Valence (UCAV) measure, which invited 24 participants to give short verbal responses to 11 abstract and 11 representational artworks. We paired the responses randomly to responses given to the same artwork, and computed semantic similarity scores using UMBC Ebiquity software. This showed significantly greater semantic similarity scores for representational than abstract art. A control analysis, in which responses were randomly paired with responses from the same category (abstract, representational) showed no significant results, ruling out a baseline effect. For both abstract and representational artworks, randomly paired responses resembled each other less than responses from the same artworks, but the effect was much larger for representational artworks. Our work shows that individuals share semantic associations in response to artworks with other viewers to a greater extent when the artwork is representational than abstract. Our novel method shows potential utility for many areas of psychology that aim to understand the semantic convergence of people’s verbal responses, not least aesthetic psychology.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Chester internal grant partly funded work towards this article.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://jov.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2466597en
dc.subjectAESTHETIC PSYCHOLOGYen
dc.subjectSEMANTIC ASSOCIATIONen
dc.subjectSOCIAL PSYCHOLOGYen
dc.subjectARTen
dc.subjectCOMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICSen
dc.subjectEMPIRICAL AESTHETICSen
dc.titleGreater cross-viewer similarity of semantic associations for representational than for abstract artworksen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Visionen
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