Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/581457
Title:
Fieldwork Going Digital
Authors:
Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek
Abstract:
This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.
Affiliation:
Massey University, New Zealand; University of Chester, UK
Citation:
Fuller, I.C. and France, D. (2014) Fieldwork Going Digital In Thornbush, M. J., Allen, C. D., and Fitzpatrick, F.A. (Eds.) Developments in Earth Surface Processes: Volume 18: Geomorphological Fieldwork. pp. 117-128. Elsevier
Publisher:
Elsevier
Publication Date:
1-Dec-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/581457
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
18
ISSN:
978-0-444-63402-3
Appears in Collections:
Geography and Development Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Ian C.en
dc.contributor.authorFrance, Dereken
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-30T15:44:14Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-30T15:44:14Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12-01en
dc.identifier.citationFuller, I.C. and France, D. (2014) Fieldwork Going Digital In Thornbush, M. J., Allen, C. D., and Fitzpatrick, F.A. (Eds.) Developments in Earth Surface Processes: Volume 18: Geomorphological Fieldwork. pp. 117-128. Elsevieren
dc.identifier.issn978-0-444-63402-3en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/581457en
dc.description.abstractThis chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.ispartofseries18en
dc.subjectfieldworken
dc.subjectdigital videoen
dc.subjectfield experimenten
dc.subjectWeb 3.0 technologyen
dc.subjectactive learningen
dc.titleFieldwork Going Digitalen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentMassey University, New Zealand; University of Chester, UKen
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