Graphite Felt: A New Material for Electroanalysis?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/579367
Title:
Graphite Felt: A New Material for Electroanalysis?
Authors:
Davies, Trevor J.
Abstract:
Limit of detection is a key property of any sensor. For electrochemical sensors, a common and successful route to decreasing the limit of detection is maximising current density, thus boosting the signal to noise ratio. In quiescent solutions this is achieved by using micro and nano sized electrodes, where decreasing the electrode size increases the mass transport coefficient.1-2 However, as the electrode size decreases the fabrication technique becomes more complicate and the cost of the electrode often increases. In addition, the magnitude of the current decreases, eventually requiring the need for high specification potentiostats. This presentation will introduce a promising new type of electrode for electroanalysis based on graphite felt – a commonly used electrode material in redox flow batteries.3 The electrode is porous with a large specific surface area, is easy to fabricate (Figure 1) and has an approximate cost of 1 pence (not including the platinum wire, that can be re-used hundreds of times).4 Surprisingly, low limits of detection are possible with this electrode, typically 10-100 times lower than conventional carbon macroelectrodes. The reasons for this will be explored, along with an explanation of the distinctive voltammetry observed with graphite felt electrodes. Given the low cost, low limit of detection and relatively high currents, graphite felt is a promising material for electroanalysis that warrants further investigation. References: [1] Henstridge, M.C.; Compton, R.G. The Chemical Record, 2012, 12, 63 [2] Dawson, K.; Wahl, A.; O’Riordan, A. J Phys. Chem. C, 2012, 116, 14665. [3] Chakrabarti, M.H.; Brandon, N.P.; Hajimolana, S.A.; Tariq, F.; Yufit, V.; Hashim, M.A.; Hussain, M.A.; Low, C.T.J.; Aravind, P.V. J. Power Sources, 2014, 253, 150. [4] Smith, R.E.G.; Davies, T.J.; Baynes, N.B.; Nichols, R.J. J. Electroanal. Chem. 2015, 747, 29.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Davies, T.J. (2015) Graphite Felt: A New Material for Electroanalysis? Electrochem 2015
Publication Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/579367
Type:
Presentation; Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
Description:
Key note lecture at Electrochem 2015
Sponsors:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Appears in Collections:
Natural Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Trevor J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-06T15:10:12Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-06T15:10:12Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationDavies, T.J. (2015) Graphite Felt: A New Material for Electroanalysis? Electrochem 2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/579367en
dc.descriptionKey note lecture at Electrochem 2015en
dc.description.abstractLimit of detection is a key property of any sensor. For electrochemical sensors, a common and successful route to decreasing the limit of detection is maximising current density, thus boosting the signal to noise ratio. In quiescent solutions this is achieved by using micro and nano sized electrodes, where decreasing the electrode size increases the mass transport coefficient.1-2 However, as the electrode size decreases the fabrication technique becomes more complicate and the cost of the electrode often increases. In addition, the magnitude of the current decreases, eventually requiring the need for high specification potentiostats. This presentation will introduce a promising new type of electrode for electroanalysis based on graphite felt – a commonly used electrode material in redox flow batteries.3 The electrode is porous with a large specific surface area, is easy to fabricate (Figure 1) and has an approximate cost of 1 pence (not including the platinum wire, that can be re-used hundreds of times).4 Surprisingly, low limits of detection are possible with this electrode, typically 10-100 times lower than conventional carbon macroelectrodes. The reasons for this will be explored, along with an explanation of the distinctive voltammetry observed with graphite felt electrodes. Given the low cost, low limit of detection and relatively high currents, graphite felt is a promising material for electroanalysis that warrants further investigation. References: [1] Henstridge, M.C.; Compton, R.G. The Chemical Record, 2012, 12, 63 [2] Dawson, K.; Wahl, A.; O’Riordan, A. J Phys. Chem. C, 2012, 116, 14665. [3] Chakrabarti, M.H.; Brandon, N.P.; Hajimolana, S.A.; Tariq, F.; Yufit, V.; Hashim, M.A.; Hussain, M.A.; Low, C.T.J.; Aravind, P.V. J. Power Sources, 2014, 253, 150. [4] Smith, R.E.G.; Davies, T.J.; Baynes, N.B.; Nichols, R.J. J. Electroanal. Chem. 2015, 747, 29.en
dc.description.sponsorshipRoyal Society of Chemistryen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectElectranalysisen
dc.subjectGraphite Felten
dc.titleGraphite Felt: A New Material for Electroanalysis?en
dc.typePresentationen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
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