Manipulation of glycemic response with isomaltulose in a milk-based drink does not affect cognitive performance in healthy adults

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/558403
Title:
Manipulation of glycemic response with isomaltulose in a milk-based drink does not affect cognitive performance in healthy adults
Authors:
Dye, Louise; Gilsenan, Mary B.; Quadt, Frits; Martens, Vanessa E. G.; Bot, Arjen; Lasikiewicz, Nicola; Camidge, Diana; Croden, Fiona; Lawton, Clare
Abstract:
Previous research suggests that glucoregulation and nutrient interventions, which alter circulating glucose, impact cognitive function. To examine the effect of modulating glycemic response using isomaltulose on cognitive function 24 healthy male adult participants consumed energy and macronutrient-matched milk-based drinks containing 50 g isomaltulose, 50 g sucrose or a water control in a counterbalanced within-subject design. Interstitial glucose was measured continuously in 12 subjects and all provided 9 capillary measures on each test day. A 30-min cognitive test battery was administered before and twice (+35 and +115 min) after drink ingestion. Immediate, delayed, recognition, verbal and working memory, and psychomotor performance were assessed. Glycemic profiles induced by the drinks differed significantly during the first but not the second post-drink test battery. Neither administration of the sucrose nor isomaltulose drinks produced consistent effects on verbal or working memory, or psychomotor performance. This study used isomaltulose as an investigative tool to lower glycemic response. Importantly, it demonstrates a lack of effect of modulating glucose on cognitive performance based on reliable, continuously measured glycemia. It refutes the hypothesis that glycemia is associated with cognitive performance and questions the suggestion that isomaltulose has an effect on cognitive performance.
Citation:
Manipulation of glycemic response with isomaltulose in a milk-based drink does not affect cognitive performance in healthy adults (2010) Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 54(4), 506
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
Publication Date:
Apr-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/558403
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.200900196
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/mnfr.200900196
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
16134125; 16134133
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDye, Louiseen
dc.contributor.authorGilsenan, Mary B.en
dc.contributor.authorQuadt, Fritsen
dc.contributor.authorMartens, Vanessa E. G.en
dc.contributor.authorBot, Arjenen
dc.contributor.authorLasikiewicz, Nicolaen
dc.contributor.authorCamidge, Dianaen
dc.contributor.authorCroden, Fionaen
dc.contributor.authorLawton, Clareen
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-22T10:34:53Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-22T10:34:53Zen
dc.date.issued2010-04en
dc.identifier.citationManipulation of glycemic response with isomaltulose in a milk-based drink does not affect cognitive performance in healthy adults (2010) Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 54(4), 506en
dc.identifier.issn16134125en
dc.identifier.issn16134133en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/mnfr.200900196en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/558403en
dc.description.abstractPrevious research suggests that glucoregulation and nutrient interventions, which alter circulating glucose, impact cognitive function. To examine the effect of modulating glycemic response using isomaltulose on cognitive function 24 healthy male adult participants consumed energy and macronutrient-matched milk-based drinks containing 50 g isomaltulose, 50 g sucrose or a water control in a counterbalanced within-subject design. Interstitial glucose was measured continuously in 12 subjects and all provided 9 capillary measures on each test day. A 30-min cognitive test battery was administered before and twice (+35 and +115 min) after drink ingestion. Immediate, delayed, recognition, verbal and working memory, and psychomotor performance were assessed. Glycemic profiles induced by the drinks differed significantly during the first but not the second post-drink test battery. Neither administration of the sucrose nor isomaltulose drinks produced consistent effects on verbal or working memory, or psychomotor performance. This study used isomaltulose as an investigative tool to lower glycemic response. Importantly, it demonstrates a lack of effect of modulating glucose on cognitive performance based on reliable, continuously measured glycemia. It refutes the hypothesis that glycemia is associated with cognitive performance and questions the suggestion that isomaltulose has an effect on cognitive performance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/mnfr.200900196en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Molecular Nutrition & Food Researchen
dc.subjectisomaltuloseen
dc.subjectcognitive performanceen
dc.subjectmemoryen
dc.titleManipulation of glycemic response with isomaltulose in a milk-based drink does not affect cognitive performance in healthy adultsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMolecular Nutrition & Food Researchen
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