The social philosophical dimensions of hospice care

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/558311
Title:
The social philosophical dimensions of hospice care
Authors:
Powell, Jason
Abstract:
Hospice care is a type of care and philosophy of care that focuses on the palliation of a terminally ill or seriously ill patient's pain and symptoms, and attending to their emotional and spiritual needs (Powell 2014). The concept of hospice has been evolving since the 11th century. Then, and for centuries thereafter, hospices were places of hospitality for the sick, wounded, or dying, as well as those for travellers and pilgrims (Dossey 1999). The modern concept of hospice includes palliative care for the incurably ill given in such institutions as hospitals or nursing homes, but also care provided to those who would rather spend their last months and days of life in their own homes (McCue and Thompson 2006).
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Powell, J. (2015). The Social Philosophical Dimensions of Hospice Care. International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences Vol. 52, pp 76-80
Publisher:
SciPress Ltd
Journal:
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Sciences
Publication Date:
15-May-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/558311
DOI:
doi:10.18052/www.scipress.com/ILSHS.52.76
Additional Links:
http://www.scipress.com/ILSHS.52.76
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Social and Political Science

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Jasonen
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-22T13:30:08Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-22T13:30:08Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-15en
dc.identifier.citationPowell, J. (2015). The Social Philosophical Dimensions of Hospice Care. International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences Vol. 52, pp 76-80en
dc.identifier.doidoi:10.18052/www.scipress.com/ILSHS.52.76en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/558311en
dc.description.abstractHospice care is a type of care and philosophy of care that focuses on the palliation of a terminally ill or seriously ill patient's pain and symptoms, and attending to their emotional and spiritual needs (Powell 2014). The concept of hospice has been evolving since the 11th century. Then, and for centuries thereafter, hospices were places of hospitality for the sick, wounded, or dying, as well as those for travellers and pilgrims (Dossey 1999). The modern concept of hospice includes palliative care for the incurably ill given in such institutions as hospitals or nursing homes, but also care provided to those who would rather spend their last months and days of life in their own homes (McCue and Thompson 2006).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSciPress Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.scipress.com/ILSHS.52.76en
dc.subjecthospicesen
dc.subjectend of lifeen
dc.subjectdeathen
dc.subjectinstitutionalisationen
dc.titleThe social philosophical dimensions of hospice careen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Social and Humanistic Sciencesen
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