Synergistic carbon metabolism in a fast growing mixotrophic freshwater microalgal species Micractinium inermum

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/552892
Title:
Synergistic carbon metabolism in a fast growing mixotrophic freshwater microalgal species Micractinium inermum
Authors:
Smith, Richard T.; Bangert, Krys; Wilkinson, Stephen J.; Gilmour, D. James
Abstract:
In recent years microalgae have attracted significant interest as a potential source of sustainable biofuel. Mixotrophic microalgae are able to simultaneously photosynthesise while assimilating and metabolising organic carbon. By combining autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolic pathways biomass productivity can be significantly increased. In this study, acetate-fed mixotrophic Micractinium inermum cultures were found to have a specific growth rate 1.74 times the sum of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth. It was hypothesised that gas exchange between the two metabolic pathways within mixotrophic cultures may have prevented growth limitation and enhanced growth. To determine the extent of synergistic gas exchange and its influence on metabolic activity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved oxygen (DO) and photosynthesis and respiration rates were measured under different trophic conditions. A 32.7 fold and 2.4 fold increase in DIC and DO concentrations, relative to autotrophic and heterotrophic cultures respectively, were coupled with significant increases in rates of photosynthesis and respiration. These data strongly support the hypothesis of mixotrophic gas exchange within M. inermum cultures. In addition to enhanced growth, this phenomenon may provide reductions in aeration and oxygen stripping costs related to microalgae production.
Affiliation:
University of Sheffield ; University of Sheffield ; University of Sheffield/University of Chester ; University of Sheffield
Citation:
Biomass and Bioenergy, 2015
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Biomass and Bioenergy
Publication Date:
11-May-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/552892
DOI:
10.1016/j.biombioe.2015.04.023
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/09619534; http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0961953415001592#
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is available open access at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0961953415001592#
ISSN:
0961-9534
Appears in Collections:
Chemical Engineering

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Richard T.en
dc.contributor.authorBangert, Krysen
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Stephen J.en
dc.contributor.authorGilmour, D. Jamesen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-14T16:56:37Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-14T16:56:37Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-11en
dc.identifier.citationBiomass and Bioenergy, 2015en
dc.identifier.issn0961-9534en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biombioe.2015.04.023en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/552892en
dc.descriptionThis article is available open access at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0961953415001592#en
dc.description.abstractIn recent years microalgae have attracted significant interest as a potential source of sustainable biofuel. Mixotrophic microalgae are able to simultaneously photosynthesise while assimilating and metabolising organic carbon. By combining autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolic pathways biomass productivity can be significantly increased. In this study, acetate-fed mixotrophic Micractinium inermum cultures were found to have a specific growth rate 1.74 times the sum of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth. It was hypothesised that gas exchange between the two metabolic pathways within mixotrophic cultures may have prevented growth limitation and enhanced growth. To determine the extent of synergistic gas exchange and its influence on metabolic activity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved oxygen (DO) and photosynthesis and respiration rates were measured under different trophic conditions. A 32.7 fold and 2.4 fold increase in DIC and DO concentrations, relative to autotrophic and heterotrophic cultures respectively, were coupled with significant increases in rates of photosynthesis and respiration. These data strongly support the hypothesis of mixotrophic gas exchange within M. inermum cultures. In addition to enhanced growth, this phenomenon may provide reductions in aeration and oxygen stripping costs related to microalgae production.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/09619534en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0961953415001592#en
dc.subjectmicroalgaeen
dc.subjectcarbon dioxideen
dc.subjectmixotrophic growthen
dc.subjectsynergisticen
dc.subjectbiodieselen
dc.subjectdissolved inorganic carbonen
dc.titleSynergistic carbon metabolism in a fast growing mixotrophic freshwater microalgal species Micractinium inermumen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sheffield ; University of Sheffield ; University of Sheffield/University of Chester ; University of Sheffielden
dc.identifier.journalBiomass and Bioenergyen
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