Terrorists, rioters and crocodiles: The political symbolism of an Olympic monster

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/550826
Title:
Terrorists, rioters and crocodiles: The political symbolism of an Olympic monster
Authors:
Charles, Alec
Abstract:
In August 2005, just a month after the announcement that London had succeeded in its bid to host the 2012 Olympic Games, the UK national press witnessed a brief rash of stories alleging the presence of a crocodile or similar water monster lurking beneath the surface of the River Lea – the river that runs from the town of Luton in Bedfordshire down to join the Thames adjacent to the Olympic site. This story re-emerged in November 2011 when a campaigner against the environmental impact of the Olympics on the river area claimed to have seen further evidence of crocodilian activity. This paper will explore the reasons for the proliferation of this story, in terms both of its function as a metonymic news-hook (it opened up directly related concerns as to the impact, organization and security of the Games) and of its metaphorical significance (its incarnation of a superstructure’s fears of an emerging threat of a monstrous underclass – one which might at once comprise terrorists, rioters and anti-establishment campaigners). It will conclude by suggesting that this monstrous myth might hold within it the possibility of the convergence of populist news media and popular democracy.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
British Politics, 2014, 9(2), pp. 161-181
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Journal:
British Politics
Publication Date:
Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/550826
DOI:
10.1057/bp.2013.17
Additional Links:
http://www.palgrave-journals.com/bp/index.html
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in British Politics. The definitive publisher-authenticated version - British Politics, 2014, 9(2), pp. 161-181 - is available online at: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/bp/journal/v9/n2/full/bp201317a.html
ISSN:
1746-918X
EISSN:
1746-9198
Appears in Collections:
Media

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCharles, Alecen
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-28T13:04:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-28T13:04:26Zen
dc.date.issued2014-06en
dc.identifier.citationBritish Politics, 2014, 9(2), pp. 161-181en
dc.identifier.issn1746-918Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/bp.2013.17en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/550826en
dc.descriptionThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in British Politics. The definitive publisher-authenticated version - British Politics, 2014, 9(2), pp. 161-181 - is available online at: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/bp/journal/v9/n2/full/bp201317a.htmlen
dc.description.abstractIn August 2005, just a month after the announcement that London had succeeded in its bid to host the 2012 Olympic Games, the UK national press witnessed a brief rash of stories alleging the presence of a crocodile or similar water monster lurking beneath the surface of the River Lea – the river that runs from the town of Luton in Bedfordshire down to join the Thames adjacent to the Olympic site. This story re-emerged in November 2011 when a campaigner against the environmental impact of the Olympics on the river area claimed to have seen further evidence of crocodilian activity. This paper will explore the reasons for the proliferation of this story, in terms both of its function as a metonymic news-hook (it opened up directly related concerns as to the impact, organization and security of the Games) and of its metaphorical significance (its incarnation of a superstructure’s fears of an emerging threat of a monstrous underclass – one which might at once comprise terrorists, rioters and anti-establishment campaigners). It will conclude by suggesting that this monstrous myth might hold within it the possibility of the convergence of populist news media and popular democracy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.palgrave-journals.com/bp/index.htmlen
dc.subjectOlympicsen
dc.subjectLondon riotsen
dc.subjectterrorismen
dc.subjectsoft newsen
dc.subjectdiscourse analysisen
dc.titleTerrorists, rioters and crocodiles: The political symbolism of an Olympic monsteren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1746-9198en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalBritish Politicsen
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